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Chimney of an old abandoned brickyard (#2)
France

Here is a view of the second chimney of the old abandoned brickyard Dupont-Delecourt in Sin-le-Noble. This chimney is 35 meters high and 2.50 meters in diameter.  The site is completely abandoned and the buildings are in ruins, nature having reasserted itself. Unfortunately, there are also a lot of rubbish there. For some, the site also serves as a playground for parts of paintball, one can find traces of impacts almost everywhere on walls. The shot was taken in july 2011, in the evening. Panorama made in HDR version (enfuse).

More information : http://www.lavoixdunord.fr/Locales/Douai/actualite/Secteur_Douai/2011/04/13/article_la-briqueterie-dupont-delecourt-des-ruin.shtml

Copyright: Franck Masschelein
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10342x5171
Uploaded: 26/07/2011
Updated: 11/09/2014
Zobrazení:

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Tags: plant; factory; abandoned; disused; brickyard; brickworks; bricks; ruins; kiln; oven; furnace; chimney; vegetation; nature; filth; rubbish dump; urbex; raquet; sin-le-noble; france; hdr; enfuse
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France is affectionately referred to as "the Hexagon" for its overall shape.French history goes back to the Gauls, a Celtic tribe which inhabited the area circa 300BC until being conquered by Julius Caesar.The Franks were the first tribe to adopt Catholic Christianity after the Roman Empire collapsed. France became an independent location in the Treaty of Verdun in (843 AD), which divided up Charlemagne's Carolingian Empire into several portions.The French monarchy reached its zenith during the reign of Louis XIV, the Sun King, who stood for seventy-two years as the Monarch of all Monarchs. His palace of Versailles and its Hall of Mirrors are a splendid treasure-trove of Baroque art.The French Revolution ended the rule of the monarchy with the motto "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity!" On July 14th, 1789 angry mobs stormed La Bastille prison and began the Revolution in which Louis XVI, his wife Marie-Antoinette and thousands of others met the guillotine.One decade after the revolution, Napolean Bonaparte seized control of the Republic and named himself Emperor. His armies conquered most of Europe and his Napoleonic Code became a lasting legal foundation for concepts of personal status and property.During the period of colonization France controlled the largest empire in the world, second only to Britain.France is one of the founding members of the European Union and the United Nations, as well as one of the nuclear armed nations of the world.Text by Steve Smith.