1 Like

Daily life of ancient Latgalian in Araisi dwelling site, Latvia
Latvia

This reconstruction portrays an Iron Age dwelling and workshop of a Latgalian jewelry maker.

Copyright: Vil Muhametshin
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 6000x3000
Hochgeladen: 28/07/2010
Aktualisiert: 25/06/2014
Angesehen:

...


Tags: iron age; reconstruction; Āraišu ezerpils; latgaļi; rotkalis; darbnīca; latvija
  • Ferenc Szedlak over 1 year ago
    I was there. Very interesting place.
  • comments powered by Disqus

    Vil Muhametshin
    Ancient Latgalians at Araisi lake dwelling site, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    Ancient Latgalian settlement at the Araisi lake, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    Ancient Latgalian kids at Araisi lake dwelling site, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    Traditional Latvian cooking at Araisi summer feast, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    Stone Age bread baking at the Araisi lake dwelling site, Latvia
    Kaspars
    Irbites3
    Kaspars
    Irbites2
    Kaspars
    Amatciems Irbites
    Gunars Kanbergs
    Sport field near water tower (1934)
    Jonas Nosalis
    Fountain
    Jonas Nosalis
    Cesis, Riga street
    Jonas Nosalis
    Belfry of St.John's Cesis Church, floor lll
    Rafael DeVill
    University Salamanca
    Bernhard Ehrminger
    Cows, the Seealp and Seealpsee
    Richard Hart
    Verona Top Seats
    Jedsada Puangsaichai
    Ferry Cruise Hellesylt - Geiranger, Geiranger Fjord, Norway
    Jan Totzek
    Ales Stenar during sunrise
    Andrea Biffi
    il Castello di Brunico - Südtirol
    johnchoy ( 蔡旭威 )
    Hongkong Apliu Street
    Dmitriy Krasko
    Coliseum. 1st floor
    Milo Timbol
    Sandbar in Caramoan Islands
    Valentin Arfire
    Parc G Ell G December 02 2008
    David Kadlec
    Sea Wolf Film Set - The Captains Quarters
    Milo Timbol
    Our Lady of the Most Holy Rosary, Mother of Peace Grotto in Caramoan Islands
    Vil Muhametshin
    Last moments before the 18th century opera performance at Rundale Palace, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    ЯRMARKA (YARMARKA), annual exhibition and art fair at the Latvian Academy of Art
    Vil Muhametshin
    At the watchtower of Ruhnu island, Estonia
    Vil Muhametshin
    Baroque dance reenactors at the Golden Hall in Rundale Palace, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    In front of Les Invalides
    Vil Muhametshin
    Kolkasrags - Cape Kolka, Latvia
    Vil Muhametshin
    "In the hand of God", Eglise St. Eustache, Les Halles, Paris
    Vil Muhametshin
    Organ-grinder on the island of Saint-Louis
    Vil Muhametshin
    Ice cubes of the Southern pier
    Vil Muhametshin
    Ancient theatre of Taormina, Sicily, Italy
    Vil Muhametshin
    City Hall square in Riga - the place where the first Christmas tree is believed to have been decorated in Europe
    Vil Muhametshin
    Asphalt production plant in Liepaja
    More About Europe

    Europe is generally agreed to be the birthplace of western culture, including such legendary innovations as the democratic nation-state, football and tomato sauce.The word Europe comes from the Greek goddess Europa, who was kidnapped by Zeus and plunked down on the island of Crete. Europa gradually changed from referring to mainland Greece until it extended finally to include Norway and Russia.Don't be confused that Europe is called a continent without looking like an island, the way the other continents do. It's okay. The Ural mountains have steadily been there to divide Europe from Asia for the last 250 million years. Russia technically inhabits "Eurasia".Europe is presently uniting into one political and economic zone with a common currency called the Euro. The European Union originated in 1993 and is now composed of 27 member states. Its headquarters is in Brussels, Belgium.Do not confuse the EU with the Council of Europe, which has 47 member states and dates to 1949. These two bodies share the same flag, national anthem, and mission of integrating Europe. The headquarters of the Council are located in Strasbourg, France, and it is most famous for its European Court of Human Rights. In spite of these two bodies, there is still no single Constitution or set of laws applying to all the countries of Europe. Debate rages over the role of the EU in regards to national sovereignty. As of January 2009, the Lisbon Treaty is the closest thing to a European Constitution, yet it has not been approved by all the EU states. Text by Steve Smith.