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Kitchen of an 18th Century Japanese Residence
Japan

In the northern part of Himeji city that is famous for the world heritage "Himeji Castle" is an old house of Sano family. It is said that the residence was built in early 18th century.

You can see how Japanese people in those days cooked their food. There are three small wood/charcoal-burning stoves and a large one in the other end of the kitchen. On the small stoves are rice kettles. A large stove and a pan are for soup.

Copyright: Kengo shimizu
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Hochgeladen: 05/06/2011
Aktualisiert: 25/04/2014
Angesehen:

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Tags: kitchen; japanese culture
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