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Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe, New Mexico USA 3
New Mexico
The Palace of the Governors built in 1610 served as the seat of government for the state of New Mexico for centuries, and is the oldest continuously occupied public building in the United States. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1960. Lew Wallace wrote the final parts of his book Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ in this building while serving as territorial governor in the late 1870s. The United States Postal Service issued a turquoise 1 1/4-cent stamp on June 17, 1960 featuring an image of the Palace.
Copyright: James womack
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 5000x2500
Subida: 22/02/2013
Actualizado: 21/07/2014
Número de vistas:

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Tags: santa fe; palace of the governors; nm; new mexico; palace; governors
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James Womack
Palace of the Governors, Santa Fe, New Mexico USA
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More About New Mexico

New Mexico is a state located in the southwestern region of the United States. Inhabited by Native American populations for many centuries, it has also been part of the Imperial Spanish viceroyalty of New Spain, part of Mexico, and a U.S. territory. Among U.S. states, New Mexico has the highest percentage of Hispanics at 45% (2008 estimate), being descendants of Spanish colonists and recent immigrants from Latin America. It also has the third-highest percentage of Native Americans after Alaska and Oklahoma, and the fifth-highest total number of Native Americans after California, Oklahoma, Arizona, and Texas. The tribes represented in the state consist of mostly Navajo and Pueblo peoples. As a result, the demographics and culture of the state are unique for their strong Spanish, Mexican, and Native American cultural influences. At a population density of 16 per square mile, New Mexico is the sixth most sparsely inhabited U.S. state.[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_mexico]