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Boston Common, Spring
Boston

As America’s oldest park, Boston Common has a rich history and a special place in New England heritage. Established in 1634, the 50 acre Common was an area of land specifically designated as owned by and for the use of the people of Boston. During the American Revolution, the British garrisoned troops here for eight years. Cows were allowed to graze the Common until 1830. It has been the site of famous public speeches, demonstrations, a papal mass, celebrations and even executions.

Today, Boston Common includes a frog pond providing skating in winter and a  summer time children’s spray pool, ball fields, a tot-lot, walking paths, monuments and memorials. It continues to be an important place for free speech and public gatherings.

The black Brewer Fountain in the foreground of the panorama is a work from 1868 by Paul Lienard with satues by Mathurin Moreau. Amphitrite, Poseidon, Acis and Galatea are the figures depicted at the base of the fountain. The image, made on an early spring day, shows the Park Street Church with its tall spire to the left of Brewer Fountain. Tremont Street is to the east, behind the fountain. The Massachusetts State House, with its golden dome, is to the north, just outside the Common.

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Copyright: Tom Sadowski
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 13000x6500
Taken: 29/03/2009
Chargée: 11/03/2010
Mis à jour: 03/03/2015
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Tags: urban; park; fountain; city; tremont; lienard
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