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Engine room of the Soviet time radio telescope in Irbene, Latvia
Latvia

The world’s eighth-largest radio telescope can be found in Kurzeme, not very far from the seaside between Kolka and Ventspils. Even today, the massive dish of the radio telescope, used during the Cold War years by the Soviet military to spy on Western adversaries, towers above the pine summits. Now, it is a place where Latvian scientists explore stars and listen to the sounds of the universe.

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Copyright: Vil muhametshin
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10184x5092
Chargée: 02/08/2012
Mis à jour: 25/06/2014
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Tags: industrial; astronomy; padomju; radio teleskops; latvija
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Vil Muhametshin
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