Angel Of The North panorama
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Panoramic photo by Paul Keating EXPERT Taken 13:47, 31/10/2009 - Views loading...

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Angel Of The North panorama

The World > Europe > UK > England

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The sculpture was created by the artist Antony Gormley as his own response to the site, which had already been chosen as the location for a ‘landmark’ work of public art. It is a stark, otherwise unremarkable, skyline site visible from a distance. The artist has described how he felt this called for a feature which would link between earth and sky.

Gormley has said of the Angel:

"The hill top site is important and has the feeling of being a megalithic mound. When you think of the mining that was done underneath the site, there is a poetic resonance. Men worked beneath the surface in the dark. Now in the light, there is a celebration and visibility of this industry.

“The face will not have individual features. The effect of the piece is in the alertness, the awareness of space and the gesture of the wings - they are not flat, they're about 3.5 degrees forward and give a sense of embrace.”

“It is important to me that the Angel is rooted in the ground - the complete antithesis of what an angel is, floating about in the ether. It has an air of mystery. You make things because they cannot be said.”

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Nearby images in England

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A: Angel Of The North

by Paul Keating, 60 meters away

The Angel of the North. Arguably the most iconic piece of modern sculpture in the UK, the Angel stand...

Angel Of The North

B: Saltwell Park

by Paul Keating, 3.3 km away

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C: Beamish Museum, Co-op

by Roger, 5.4 km away

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D: Andrews House Waiting Room, Tanfield Railway

by Andy Martin, 5.6 km away

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E: Marley Hill Engine Shed, Tanfield Railway

by Andy Martin, 5.7 km away

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Marley Hill Engine Shed, Tanfield Railway

F: Old engines near Marley Hill Engine Shed

by Ian Britton, 5.7 km away

A line of old locomotives next to Marley Hill Engine Shed on the Tanfield Railway.

Old engines near Marley Hill Engine Shed

G: Baxter & Y7 Steaming Up at Rowley Station, Beamish Museum

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Baxter & Y7 Steaming Up at Rowley Station, Beamish Museum

H: Steam at Rowley Station Goods Yard

by Andy Martin, 5.8 km away

Steam Vehicles Rowley Station during the 2012 Great North Steam Fair. See the Beamish Transport Blog ...

Steam at Rowley Station Goods Yard

I: Engine Shed - Tanfield Railway

by Andy Martin, 5.8 km away

One of the railway's engine sheds taken during the IRON175 Coal and Iron event on 23rd February 2014....

Engine Shed - Tanfield Railway

J: Gateshead Quayside

by Ian Britton, 5.8 km away

Gateshead Quayside

Gateshead Quayside

This panorama was taken in England, Europe

This is an overview of Europe

Europe is generally agreed to be the birthplace of western culture, including such legendary innovations as the democratic nation-state, football and tomato sauce.

The word Europe comes from the Greek goddess Europa, who was kidnapped by Zeus and plunked down on the island of Crete. Europa gradually changed from referring to mainland Greece until it extended finally to include Norway and Russia.

Don't be confused that Europe is called a continent without looking like an island, the way the other continents do. It's okay. The Ural mountains have steadily been there to divide Europe from Asia for the last 250 million years. Russia technically inhabits "Eurasia".

Europe is presently uniting into one political and economic zone with a common currency called the Euro. The European Union originated in 1993 and is now composed of 27 member states. Its headquarters is in Brussels, Belgium.

Do not confuse the EU with the Council of Europe, which has 47 member states and dates to 1949. These two bodies share the same flag, national anthem, and mission of integrating Europe. The headquarters of the Council are located in Strasbourg, France, and it is most famous for its European Court of Human Rights.

In spite of these two bodies, there is still no single Constitution or set of laws applying to all the countries of Europe. Debate rages over the role of the EU in regards to national sovereignty. As of January 2009, the Lisbon Treaty is the closest thing to a European Constitution, yet it has not been approved by all the EU states. 

Text by Steve Smith.

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