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Bluebells on Blackhill
England

At a number of places along the Malvern Hills there are these fantastic shows of bluebells with fields of blue disapearing into the distance. The hills are a managed area that usually contain grazing cattle. But after a set point in the year the cattle are kept off this part of the hills to allow the bluebells to come through. Due to this every year they seem to have a better show than the year before. They also aren't limited to just what you see here as they extend well into the surrounded wooded areas too.

I chose to visit early one morning to get the shadows and the sun poking through the trees. Also at this time it's quiet with very few people around as a natural show of this level brings the crowds, each wanting to get their own views of this rich carpet of blue.

Copyright: Robert Bilsland
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 11698x5849
Uploaded: 03/05/2014
Updated: 06/05/2014
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Tags: bluebells; blue; hills; sky; green; nature; sun; clouds
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