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Buyuk Hamam, Nicosia (2009)
Nicosia

The Buyuk Hamam, or Great Turkish Bath, is built on the ruins of  a 14th century Lusignan church, St George of the Latins. Only the entrance of the church remains, but it bears similarities to the porch of the Bedesten.

The building was converted into a bath house when the Ottomans arrived in Nicosia in 1571. Being one of the most frequented Turkish Baths open to the public, its services were very important, particularly as there were no baths in most houses. With its lukewarm, cold and hot areas, it was a standard Turkish bath.

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Copyright: Bo De Visser
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 7768x3884
Taken: 01/12/2009
Uploaded: 26/12/2009
Updated: 03/03/2015
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Tags: buyuk; hamam; bath; great turkish bath; nicosia; lefkosia; north cyprus; cyprus; prorama
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More About Nicosia

Nicosia, known locally as Lefkosia (Greek: Λευκωσία, Turkish: Lefkoşa), is the capital and largest city of Cyprus. It is located on the River Pedieos and situated almost in the centre of the island, it is the seat of government as well as the main business centre. Nicosia is the capital of the Nicosia District. Following the intercommunal violence of the 1960s, the capital was divided between the island's Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities in the south and north respectively. An attempted coup to unite the island with Greece in 1974 led to a Turkish invasion, leaving the capital divided since then, with Turkish Cypriots claiming the north as the capital of their own state, Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) (recognised only by Turkey). On 3 April 2008, as part of efforts to reunify the island, a symbolic wall dividing the two communities at Ledra Street was opened. South of the Green Line, the population of the city is 270,000 (late 2004), while a further 84,893 live in the north.[1] Nicosia is important commercially with many shops, two modern shopping malls, restaurants and entertainment. The city is a trade centre and manufactures textiles, leather, pottery, plastic, and other products. Copper mines are nearby. Nicosia is the seat of the University of Cyprus (UCY) and four other universities. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicosia