0 Likes

Buyuk Hamam, Nicosia (2009)
Nicosia

The Buyuk Hamam, or Great Turkish Bath, is built on the ruins of  a 14th century Lusignan church, St George of the Latins. Only the entrance of the church remains, but it bears similarities to the porch of the Bedesten.

The building was converted into a bath house when the Ottomans arrived in Nicosia in 1571. Being one of the most frequented Turkish Baths open to the public, its services were very important, particularly as there were no baths in most houses. With its lukewarm, cold and hot areas, it was a standard Turkish bath.

View More »

Copyright: Bo de visser
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 7768x3884
Uploaded: 26/12/2009
Updated: 09/09/2014
Views:

...


Tags: buyuk; hamam; bath; great turkish bath; nicosia; lefkosia; north cyprus; cyprus; prorama
comments powered by Disqus

Julia Avanesova
Byuyk Khan (Büyük Han), Nicosia, Cyprus
Ergec Senturk
Selimiye Camii
Ergec Senturk
Selimiye Camii, Lefkoşa, Kıbrıs
Ergec Senturk
Selimiye Camii, Lefkoşa, Cyprus 3
Kirill Makarov
Old town of Nicosia. Faneromeni Church
Kirill Makarov
Ledra Street At Night
Gary Quigg
Leffkosia - Weaving Mill Cafe
Gary Quigg
Lefkosia Border - Barricaded Street
Kirill Makarov
Street View in Old Town of Nicosia
Ergec Senturk
Nicosia Restaurants, Cyprus
Nico Winkler
Steets-Nikosia-Arsinois-Perikleous
Volker Uhl
byzantinisches Museum Nikosia
Florian Knorn
In the tower of the Ulmer Münster
Tom Sadowski
Trans Alaska Pipeline near Copper Center, Alaska
Jann Lipka
1961 Lancia Appia Sport Zagato
Farjoun, Daniel
Prainha at Rio de Janeiro - Brazil
Seungsang Yoo(유승상)
Taklamakan Desert road Protection
Hans Molenkamp
Lighthouse of Urk
Robin Waarts
Rotterdam city hall council chamber
Robert Mročka
Úzkorozchodná železniční trať - Třemešná ve Slezsku
Martin Berta
Ggantija megalithic temple Gozo
Tzatzanis - Maravelakis
Inside the monumental olive tree of Vouves
sk vadim
Driving Railway Tunnel in Tunnel Complex No. 6, Sochi, Russia
Matt Mascheri
Prayer Room Shwedagon Pagoda Yangon Myanmar
Bo de Visser
Manifattura Tabacchi 4 - Abandoned (2010)
Bo de Visser
Tunnel Boring Machine North/Southline, Amsterdam (2010)
Bo de Visser
New Kids - Snackbar Maaskantje
Bo de Visser
Chambre du Commerce 3 - abandoned - Belgium (2010)
Bo de Visser
Crystal2
Bo de Visser
Cinema Tuschinski - Projector Room - Amsterdam (2010)
Bo de Visser
Battersea Control Room B2 (2009)
Bo de Visser
Villa Sbertoli 2 - abandoned (2010)
Bo de Visser
Hindeloopen2 (2010)
Bo de Visser
Cinema Tuschinski - Amsterdam (2010)
Bo de Visser
Bollenveld3
Bo de Visser
Battersea Power Station London - Control Room A (2009)
More About Nicosia

Nicosia, known locally as Lefkosia (Greek: Λευκωσία, Turkish: Lefkoşa), is the capital and largest city of Cyprus. It is located on the River Pedieos and situated almost in the centre of the island, it is the seat of government as well as the main business centre. Nicosia is the capital of the Nicosia District. Following the intercommunal violence of the 1960s, the capital was divided between the island's Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities in the south and north respectively. An attempted coup to unite the island with Greece in 1974 led to a Turkish invasion, leaving the capital divided since then, with Turkish Cypriots claiming the north as the capital of their own state, Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) (recognised only by Turkey). On 3 April 2008, as part of efforts to reunify the island, a symbolic wall dividing the two communities at Ledra Street was opened. South of the Green Line, the population of the city is 270,000 (late 2004), while a further 84,893 live in the north.[1] Nicosia is important commercially with many shops, two modern shopping malls, restaurants and entertainment. The city is a trade centre and manufactures textiles, leather, pottery, plastic, and other products. Copper mines are nearby. Nicosia is the seat of the University of Cyprus (UCY) and four other universities. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicosia