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Dormouse in the Woods
England

The Queenswood Country Park and Arboretum covers a large area compromising of a 67 acre arboretum containing over 1,200 rare and exotic trees from all over the world and a 103 acre area of semi-natural ancient woodland. The planting of the trees started in 1953 to mark the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. Now there is a collection of Californian Redwood trees that can grow to over 100 meters tall and a collection of Japanese Maples that present a fantastic show of colour through the autumn.

The park has recently had installed a sculpture trail depicting animals you might find in each sort of woodland. Each piece was carved by a local sculpture from a variety of locally sourced wood. Here you can see a Dormouse with it's berries and nuts, created by Steve Elsby. A fantastic piece of art to find just sitting in between the trees.

Copyright: Robert Bilsland
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 11708x5854
Uploaded: 20/11/2011
Updated: 26/08/2014
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Tags: queenswood; country park; arboretum; forest; doormouse; nuts; berries; trunks; brown; green; wooden; carving; chainsaw
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