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Driver's Cabin of D51 Steam Locomotive
Japan

This is a driver's cabin of D51 steam locomotive displayed at Nagahama Train Square.

From 1936 to 1944, more than 1,100 D51 steam locomotives were built.

180 of them are preserved all over Japan, and two of them still runs.

This steam locomotive was built in 1942 and used mainly as freight train until 1970.

Beside this steam locomotive is an electric locomotive (Type ED70) which replaced this old machine.

You can get on both locomotives' driver's cabin.
A great pavilion for railfans.

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Copyright: Kengo shimizu
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Uploaded: 25/08/2012
Updated: 25/04/2014
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Tags: japan; shiga; nagahama; train; steam locomotive
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