3 Likes

Entrance to the Tomb of Blessed Virgin Mary - Jerusalem
Middle East

The burial caves were cut into the rock in the 1st C AD. They were later expanded into a cross-shaped church with the tomb in its center. In the 6th C Ad an octagon shaped church was built on the upper level, covering the tomb. It was destroyed in the Persian invasion (614). During the Crusaders period a large church was built on the upper level, and a monastery was also added - the Abbey of St. Mary of the Valley of Jehoshaphat, which was protected by a wall. The staircase and entrance were also part of the Crusaders church. It was destroyed by Saladin (1187) and all what was left was the south entrance and staircase. The lower church was subjected to flooding, since it is adjacent to the Kidron brook. After the floods of 1972 the area was cleaned, and at that time there were archaeological excavations conducted here to determine the age of the complex. Today there are frequent visits by Christian pilgrims and other tourists. The highlight of the religious events is August 15, the feast of Assumption.

Copyright: Zoran Strajin
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 12040x6020
Uploaded: 11/11/2010
Updated: 29/08/2014
Views:

...


Tags: tomb; grotto; inside; jerusalem; israel; virgin mary; christianity; low light; staircase; dark; candles; door
comments powered by Disqus

Zoran Strajin
Tomb of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Jerusalem
Werner Joemann
Grotte des Verrates Jesu im Kidrontal am Ölberg
Werner Joemann
Garten Gethzemanie, direkt neben der Kirche der Nationen am Ölberg
William Hamblin
Tomb of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Jerusalem), interior
Zoran Strajin
Church of All Nations, Mount Olive, Jerusalem
Werner Joemann
Kirche der Nationen - am Garten Gethzemanie
Zoran Strajin
The Basilica of the Agony at the Garden of Gethsemane - Jerusalem - (Church of All Nations)
William Hamblin
Church of All Nations (Gethsemane), Jerusalem
Zoran Strajin
The Church of All Nations, Jerusalem - entrance
Furman Artjem
Church of Mary Magdalene
Werner Joemann
Maria Magdalena am Ölberg in Jerusalem
Zoran Strajin
Mary Magdalene Ortodox Monastery, Olive Mountain, Jerusalem
Federico Infanti
Dc3 Dakota cockpit
Takács István
Kekszalag 2010, Blue Ribbon Regatta 2010 - Szélcsend / Calm
Jedsada Puangsaichai
The Sanctuary of Truth, North Wing
heiwa4126
Daikoku at Ebisu station
Kostas Kaltsas
Agios Nikolaos
Tom Sadowski
Fish Wheel #84, on the Banks of the Copper River, Near Chitina, Alaska
Florian Knorn
Carton The Morrison
Florian Knorn
Festival Of World Cultures 2010
Kyrre Andersen
Cliff diving 2010 Kragero
Mark Fink
Rear Portico Vanderbilt Mansion Hyde Park NY
Florian Knorn
World Cup 2010 - Public Viewing in Paris
Florian Knorn
Dublin Zoo Elefants
Zoran Strajin
Fairy Tales Cottage??!! - Sirogojno Ethno Village, Zlatibor, Serbia [SNS HDR]
Zoran Strajin
The Tomb of Christ [Rotunda], Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem
Zoran Strajin
Bastioned Wall - Petrovaradin Fortress
Zoran Strajin
Bridge Train Museum Haifa
Zoran Strajin
Solomon's Stables - in the front of the gate, Temple Mount, Jerusalem
Zoran Strajin
Haifa Sightseeing, from Mt. Karmel
Zoran Strajin
Nati Observer [with The Dead Sea in the far distance], Israel
Zoran Strajin
CC - Emperor Suite - Caesarea, Israel
Zoran Strajin
Greek Ortodox Chappell, Church of the Holy Sepulchre - Jerusalem, Israel
Zoran Strajin
Rooftop 3
Zoran Strajin
Antics shops in Arabic Bazzar, Old City, Jerusalem [Lucis Art version]
Zoran Strajin
Rest for a while
More About Middle East

Modern civilization began right here in the Tigris-Euphrates river valley. Also known as the Fertile Crescent or Mesopotamia, this is the place where, six thousand years ago, agriculture, writing and mathematics were brought into widespread use.The term "Middle East" comes from the British navy, which used it to describe the countries on the trade route from Europe to India and China. Everything from Afghanistan to Morocco may possibly be classified as "middle eastern", depending on whom you ask -- and when.Only a partial list of past Empires in the middle eastern territory includes Sumeria, Babylonia, Persia, the Ottoman Empire and the Roman Empire!When northern Europe was still lurking about in slimy cold stone castles playing chess, the Middle East was enjoying the flowers of poetry, luxurious craftsmanship, music and literature. In fact, the Renaissance in Europe was partly inspired by stories brought back from the middle east by travelers along the trade route.Strategic location, religious history and the world's largest supply of crude oil have kept the Middle East at the center of world activity for centuries. The saga continues.Text by Steve Smith.