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Exhibition "From the Gothic Style to Art Nouveau" in Rundale Palace, Latvia
Latvia

Part of the exhibition opened on 24 May 2012 covers the period from Late Gothic to Late Baroque (late 15th c. – 2nd quarter of the 18th c.). The exhibition will eventually comprise fourteen exhibition halls and is planned to be completed in 2016.


The objective of the Rundāle Palace Museum’s exhibition “From the Gothic Style to Art Nouveau” is to partially fill the gap resulting from the absence of a European decorative arts museum in Latvia. The exhibition provides an overview of the development of European and Latvian decorative arts during different historical style periods.

Author – Imants Lancmanis, Design – Lauma Lancmane

More about Rundale Palace museum - http://rundale.net

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Copyright: Vil muhametshin
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Resolution: 10000x5000
Uploaded: 31/01/2013
Updated: 25/06/2014
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Tags: history; art; baroque; rastrelli; rundāles pils; latvija
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