Florence - Santa Croce (Interior)
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Panoramic photo by wolfgang-guelcker EXPERT Taken 14:02, 22/04/2012 - Views loading...

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Florence - Santa Croce (Interior)

The World > Europe > Italy > Tuscany > Florence

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Santa Croce was built as a church of the mendicant order of the Franciscans from 1294 on, designed by Arnolfo di Cambio, on the outskirts of the city at that time. The plan of the church corresponds to a "T". Typical of Santa Croce as a mendicant church is the great openness and lucidity, best seen in the panorama when viewing towards the entrance to the west.

The original frescoes of the side walls are lost, remains can be seen in the middle of the north wall. The many monotone distributed altars on the side walls with large paintings are not medieval, but were built by Vasari from 1566 on.

Santa Croce became the burial ground of famous Italiens: in the far west on the south wall is the grave of Michelangelo, on the north wall opposite the grave of Galileo.

The greatest fame of the church are some of the 11 chapels with frescoes on the east side of the church, at the head of the "T". They are unfortunately obscured by the large scaffold. The middle chapel has been frescoed by Agnolo Gaddi in 1380, the Bardi chapel right of it by Giotto and the subsequent Peruzzi chapel also by Giotto (around 1320). In the Bardi chapel Franciscan legends are shown, to be seen in the Panorama is a panel of Franciscus on the altar from 1270.

The panorama shots were taken handheld.

Wikipedia: here

To the panorama taken from the eastern part of the nave: here

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This panorama was taken in Florence

This is an overview of Florence

Overview and History

Florence has been relaxing since the very beginning, when Julius Caesar adapted the location to serve as a home for veteran soldiers. Its name means "flourishing" and that's what it's been doing ever since.

If we can ignore that pesky evidence of neolithic rock-smashers, Florence has been occupied for about two thousand years.

Caesar wisely chose the intersection of two rivers for the location of Florence, for defensive purposes. Admittedly he was not the first person to think of this idea, but we'll let him have it for now.

The Arno and Mugnone are the rivers over which Florentines built their beautiful bridges, in order to have something else to decorate. See Ponte Veccio for illustration.

Like all Roman cities, Florence was originally rectangular in shape, bearing long straight roads with ninety degree intersections. The heart of the city was originally at the intersection where today, you will find the Piazza della Republica.

"Piazza" means plaza, not pizza. For my American subway riders.

Being located in a fertile valley along a major river attracted people, commerce and wealth, according to the laws of burgeoning civilization, and Florence grew up to be a leader in all the new phases, such as the Cult of Isis and later, Christianity.

The dark ages hit Florence a little earlier than the rest of Europe. Because of its location on the Italian peninsula, it was fought over viciously during the Gotho-Byzantine war. When Florence was cut off from communications and trade with Rome in the 6th century, its status descended into terrible Lombard dominion most, most foul.

Charlemagne and the Carolingian empire were next up in the roster of rulers, so Florence became a county of the Holy Roman Empire.

Over the next five centuries Florence experienced more growth and construction and landed as the capital of the Tuscany region in the thirteenth century. Merchants' associations multiplied and brought international trade relations to Florence, and yet more wealth for the construction of Gothic buildings, such as the Cathedral Santa Maria del Fiore.

By the thirteenth century, Florence had rightly earned the reputation as the main city of the West. To symbolize this, they constructed the Palazzo della Signoria.

Enter Black Plague, 1348. Cue flood, wipe out bridges over Arno river. Begin serious urban planning as of fourteenth century, to remedy the economic and political crises.

Remedy? Rhymes with Medici? The Medici family took power by representing the disenfranchised middle class, and began the Italian Renaissance proper.

I suppose being bankers to the Pope didn't hurt the Medicis in their stellar rise to power and fame. The family sponsored generations of artists and thus became responsible for the creation of unsurpassable masterpieces by such titans as Leonardo di Vinci, Michaelangelo, Donatello, Boticelli, Brunelleschi... apologies to the curtness of this sneeze of a historical kleenex I write.

Let's jump to the year 1737, when the last of the Medicis died. Florence temporarily became part of the Austrian empire, then the capital of Italy in 1865. Rome took over six years later as capital and we enter the modern times.

Florence was occupied by the Germans for a year during World War Two. Mussolini met here with Hitler in 1940, after which he led Italy into the war as an Axis power.

In Florence, you will get an education in the Renaissance whether you mean to or not. Her progress now continues into the third millenium, where preservation may be the key word. Automobile exhaust is bad for marble, you know?

Getting There

If traveling by air, you'll fly into either Pisa International Airport or Peretola Airport. Or the ocean but let's say that won't happen.

Peretola is closer to Florence (5km) but it's a small, single-runway airport. In 1990 it was renamed after Amerigo Vespucci, so Peretola is also called Vespucci just to confuse matters. From it you can take a bus, taxi or rent a car to get where you're going. The bus takes about half an hour and costs less than five Euro.

Pisa airport is keeping Tuscany's profile high in the world! The best way to connect to Florence is by the train, which costs about the same five Euros but takes an hour and a half.

Arriving by train is another option for European travelers. For some reason they haven't finished the underground transatlantic subway so Americans will have to fly.

The Santa Maria Novella train station is right in the center of the city and offers connections to bus lines, taxis, or your shoes for walking. For long range view, it connects Rome, and all of southern Italy, to the rest of Europe.

Car rental information is here. Practice yelling and swerving first so you'll be ready.

Taxi fare from Vespucci airport should be about fifteen Euro.

Transportation

The city transit is run by ATAF bus company. Tickets are under two Euro and you can buy them all over the place at newspaper stands and such.

Most importantly, the center of the city is closed to through traffic and requires a special residency permit to drive there. The restricted area is called the ZTL, or Zone of Traffic Limitation. Car renters make note.

People and Culture

Florence is a very international city and they're on the Euro, so visiting while you're in Europe is no problem. Skipping Florence is a problem. Trying to describe it is an even bigger one, so come and have a look for yourself. The drinking age is only eighteen and the city is filled with students.

Things to do & Recommendations

If you speak the language of food and wine, Florence will be your home away from home. Tuscany is one of the world's great wine producers; the Chianti region is only a few clicks west of Florence.

Outdoor cinemas, theater, opera, ballet, cafes, and museums will easily fill up your time walking and gawking.

Here is a short list of pinpoints to start with in Florence, again with apologies to everything and everyone we had to leave out in consideration of space.

Michaelangelo's David

Santa Croce: medieval Franciscan basilica, National Central Library

Rifredi: where you can find Medici villas and also Chinese and African immigrants, and Peretola airport.

Check out Oltrarno for a kinda bohemian neighborhood.

For nightlife, go through all the floors of Central Park (the club) and call me in the morning. Which will be around 3pm if you really do it. Here's the best link we've got since their site went down.

Now can you please pass me the carafe? People do not grow any older while we're at the table. Thanks!

Text by Steve Smith.

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