Forsythia Scanner finistere
Share
mail
License license
loading...
Loading ...

Panoramic photo by dieter kik EXPERT MAESTRO Taken 09:11, 08/04/2010 - Views loading...

Advertisement

Forsythia Scanner finistere

The World > Europe > France > Finistere > Cornouaille

  • Like / unlike
  • thumbs up
  • thumbs down

Forsythia
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Forsythia (pronounced /fɔrˈsɪθiə/)[1] is a genus of flowering plants in the family Oleaceae (olive family). There are about 11 species, mostly native to eastern Asia, but one native to southeastern Europe. The common name is also Forsythia; the genus is named after William Forsyth.[2][3][4]

They are deciduous shrubs typically growing to a height of 1–3 m (3–9 ft.) and, rarely, up to 6 m (18 ft.), with rough grey-brown bark. The leaves are opposite, usually simple but sometimes trifoliate with a basal pair of small leaflets, and range from 2–10 cm (1–4 in.) in length and, rarely, up to 15 cm (6 in.) long; the margin is serrated or entire. The flowers are produced in the early spring before the leaves, bright yellow with a deeply four-lobed corolla, the petals joined only at the base. The Forsythia's flowers are impressive with the fact that they are able to produce lactose (the milk sugar). Lactose is very rarely established in other natural sources except milk. This shrub is perhaps best known for its relevance in the children's game 'rabbits' that emerged in the 20th century and the ability to predict snowfall. The bright yellow petals of the shrub were likened to bananas, which children would then pretend to eat, although the tenuous link between bananas and rabbits has never been established.[1] The actual fruit is a dry capsule, containing several winged seeds.
A genetic study[8] does not fully match the traditionally accepted species listed above, and groups the species in four clades: (1) F. suspensa; (2) F. europaea — F. giraldiana; (3) F. ovata — F. japonica — F. viridissima; and (4) F. koreana — F. mandschurica — F. saxatilis. Of the additional species, F. koreana is usually cited as a variety of F. viridissima, and F. saxatilis as a variety of F. japonica;[9] the genetic evidence suggests they may be better treated as distinct species.
Forsythias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Brown-tail and The Gothic.
[edit]Cultivation and uses

The hybrids Forsythia × intermedia (F. suspensa × F. viridissima) and Forsythia × variabilis (F. ovata × F. suspensa) have been produced in cultivation.[5]
Forsythias are popular early spring flowering shrubs in gardens and parks. Two are commonly cultivated for ornament, Forsythia × intermedia and Forsythia suspensa. They are both spring flowering shrubs, with yellow flowers. They are grown and prized for being tough, reliable garden plants. Forsythia × intermedia is the more commonly grown, is smaller, has an upright habit, and produces strongly coloured flowers. Forsythia suspensa is a large to very large shrub, can be grown as a weeping shrub on banks, and has paler flowers. Many named garden cultivars can also be found.[5] Forsythia is frequently forced indoors in the early spring.
Commercial propagation is usually by cuttings, taken from green wood after flowering in late spring to early summer; alternatively, cuttings may be taken between November and February.[5] Low hanging boughs often take root, and can be removed for transplanting. A common practice is to place a weight over a branch to keep it on the ground, and after it has rooted, to dig up the roots and cut the rooted part from the main branch, this can then be planted.
F. suspensa (Chinese: 连翘; pinyin: liánqiào) is considered one of the 50 fundamental herbs in Chinese herbology. Forsythia sticks are used to bow a Korean string instrument called ajaeng.Forsythia
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Forsythia (pronounced /fɔrˈsɪθiə/)[1] is a genus of flowering plants in the family Oleaceae (olive family). There are about 11 species, mostly native to eastern Asia, but one native to southeastern Europe. The common name is also Forsythia; the genus is named after William Forsyth.[2][3][4]

They are deciduous shrubs typically growing to a height of 1–3 m (3–9 ft.) and, rarely, up to 6 m (18 ft.), with rough grey-brown bark. The leaves are opposite, usually simple but sometimes trifoliate with a basal pair of small leaflets, and range from 2–10 cm (1–4 in.) in length and, rarely, up to 15 cm (6 in.) long; the margin is serrated or entire. The flowers are produced in the early spring before the leaves, bright yellow with a deeply four-lobed corolla, the petals joined only at the base. The Forsythia's flowers are impressive with the fact that they are able to produce lactose (the milk sugar). Lactose is very rarely established in other natural sources except milk. This shrub is perhaps best known for its relevance in the children's game 'rabbits' that emerged in the 20th century and the ability to predict snowfall. The bright yellow petals of the shrub were likened to bananas, which children would then pretend to eat, although the tenuous link between bananas and rabbits has never been established.[1] The actual fruit is a dry capsule, containing several winged seeds.
A genetic study[8] does not fully match the traditionally accepted species listed above, and groups the species in four clades: (1) F. suspensa; (2) F. europaea — F. giraldiana; (3) F. ovata — F. japonica — F. viridissima; and (4) F. koreana — F. mandschurica — F. saxatilis. Of the additional species, F. koreana is usually cited as a variety of F. viridissima, and F. saxatilis as a variety of F. japonica;[9] the genetic evidence suggests they may be better treated as distinct species.
Forsythias are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Brown-tail and The Gothic.
[edit]Cultivation and uses

The hybrids Forsythia × intermedia (F. suspensa × F. viridissima) and Forsythia × variabilis (F. ovata × F. suspensa) have been produced in cultivation.[5]
Forsythias are popular early spring flowering shrubs in gardens and parks. Two are commonly cultivated for ornament, Forsythia × intermedia and Forsythia suspensa. They are both spring flowering shrubs, with yellow flowers. They are grown and prized for being tough, reliable garden plants. Forsythia × intermedia is the more commonly grown, is smaller, has an upright habit, and produces strongly coloured flowers. Forsythia suspensa is a large to very large shrub, can be grown as a weeping shrub on banks, and has paler flowers. Many named garden cultivars can also be found.[5] Forsythia is frequently forced indoors in the early spring.
Commercial propagation is usually by cuttings, taken from green wood after flowering in late spring to early summer; alternatively, cuttings may be taken between November and February.[5] Low hanging boughs often take root, and can be removed for transplanting. A common practice is to place a weight over a branch to keep it on the ground, and after it has rooted, to dig up the roots and cut the rooted part from the main branch, this can then be planted.
F. suspensa (Chinese: 连翘; pinyin: liánqiào) is considered one of the 50 fundamental herbs in Chinese herbology. Forsythia sticks are used to bow a Korean string instrument called ajaeng.

comments powered by Disqus

Nearby images in Cornouaille

map

A: Roller Acrobatic Creach Gwen Quimper 9591

by dieter kik, 90 meters away

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roller_acrobatiqueLe roller acrobatique (ou « freestyle skating » en ang...

Roller Acrobatic Creach Gwen Quimper 9591

B: Wheels

by dieter kik, 90 meters away

these panorama is made for wwp (http://worldwidepanorama.org) event "diversity" in the quimper skatin...

Wheels

C: Tir à l' Arc Compagnie des Archers de l'Odet Quimper France

by dieter kik, 150 meters away

Les arcs utilisés de nos jours n'ont plus rien à voir avec leurs ancêtres. Le bois a souvent été remp...

Tir à l' Arc Compagnie des Archers de l'Odet Quimper France

D: Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5135

by dieter kik, 200 meters away

Présentation de l’association “Courir avec Brin d’avoine” Posté par fouleebrindavoine le 06 jan 2009 ...

Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5135

E: Kerogan Quimper

by dieter kik, 200 meters away

Kerogan Quimper

F: Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5111

by dieter kik, 210 meters away

Présentation de l’association “Courir avec Brin d’avoine”Posté par fouleebrindavoine le 06 jan 2009 |...

Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5111

G: Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5159

by dieter kik, 210 meters away

Présentation de l’association “Courir avec Brin d’avoine” Posté par fouleebrindavoine le 06 jan 2009 ...

Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5159

H: Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5131

by dieter kik, 210 meters away

Présentation de l’association “Courir avec Brin d’avoine”Posté par fouleebrindavoine le 06 jan 2009 |...

Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5131

I: Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5123

by dieter kik, 210 meters away

Présentation de l’association “Courir avec Brin d’avoine” Posté par fouleebrindavoine le 06 jan 2009 ...

Foulées brin d'avoine 2010 5123

J: Narcisse jaune Creach Gwen Quimper

by dieter kik, 220 meters away

Le narcisse jaune (Narcissus pseudonarcissus), appelé aussi narcisse trompette, est une plante monoco...

Narcisse jaune Creach Gwen Quimper

This panorama was taken in Cornouaille

This is an overview of Cornouaille

Cornouaille

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

Capitale historique Quimper

Langue(s) Français - Breton

Religion Catholique

Superficie 5 979 Km²

Population 456 307 (1999)

Gwenn ha du.svg Portail de la Bretagne

La Cornouaille (Kernev, Bro Gernev en breton) est un pays de Bretagne (à ne pas confondre avec la Cornouailles britannique, dont le nom s'écrit avec un "s").

Le gentilé de la Cornouaille bretonne est cornouaillais  e (le gentilé de la Cornouailles britannique est cornique).

Étymologie

Cornouaille se dit Kerne, Kernev ou Bro Gerne en breton, et Cornugallia en latin, parfois « Cornubia ».

* Il est possible que ce nom lui ait été donné en référence à cette région de Cornouailles (Kernow), tout comme l'actuel Devon (ancienne Dumnonia) a donné son nom à la Domnonée qui désignait la côte Nord de la Bretagne au Haut Moyen Âge.

* Selon une autre hypothèse qui a eu longtemps cours, le nom serait d'origine anglo-saxonne et signifierait « Le pays des étrangers » en référence au cantonnement des Celtes d'Outre-Manche par les envahisseurs angles, saxons, jutes et frisons.

* Une troisième hypothèse, basée sur la traduction latine cornugallia, est invoquée par certains auteurs : cornugallia signifierait le coin de la Gaule, relativement à la situation géographique de la Cornouaille bretonne.

Antiquité tardive

Les deux Cornouaille(s) trouvent plus vraisemblablement leur origine commune à la fin du IIIe siècle : les incursions de pirates saxons, frisons et scots, associées aux pillages des bagaudes, contraignent les villes armoricaines (entre autres) à s'entourer en urgence de murailles dont les restes se voient encore à Alet, Brest, Nantes, Rennes et Vannes. Devant l'incurie de l'empire romain, le responsable de la défense des côtes, le ménapien Carausius (puis son successeur Allectus) établit entre 288 et 296 un empire séparé sur les côtes nord et sud de la Manche pour les garantir des invasions.

L'empereur Constance Chlore les vainc en 293 et 296 et, ayant rétabli l'unité de l'empire de ce côté, organise la défense côtière en transférant des Bretons en Armorique à partir de 296-297. Ces Bretons sont des Cornovii, peuple sans doute fidèle à Rome et choisi pour ce motif. Le chef-lieu de leur cité est à Viroconium Cornoviorum (l'actuelle Wroxeter) et ils occupent plus au nord le port de Deva (Chester). Les Cornovii étant chargés du contrôle militaire des pointes occidentales de la Bretagne et de l'Armorique, c’est-à-dire de l'ouest de la Manche, leur nom se serait conservé en ces lieux. Il ne s'agit donc pas d'une colonisation massive comme cela arrivera au VIe siècle, mais d'une occupation militaire.

Le Tractus armoricanus et nervicanus (administration militaire chargée du contrôle de toutes les côtes de Boulogne à la Gironde), et son bras armé, la Classis armoricana (Flotte armoricaine), ne sont créés proprement qu'en 370, sous le règne de l'empereur Valentinien Ier.

Haut Moyen Âge

D'autres princes sont dits avoir régné sur les côtes nord et sud de la Manche occidentale, comme le roi de Cornouaille Daniel Drem Rud au VIe siècle, et le fameux comte Conomor assimilé au roi Marc de la Cornouailles britannique (Marcus Cunomorus).

Entre 815 et 839, Egbert annexe le royaume breton de Cornouaille.

La Cornouaille armoricaine est mentionnée pour la première fois et indirectement entre 852 et 857 quand « l'évêque de Saint-Corentin », Anaweten, est qualifié de Cornugallensis (adj. latin dérivé de Cornugallia).

L'existence d'une commune d'Anjou dénommée « La Cornuaille » a suscité une hypothèse qui en ferait une appellation géographique ou militaire couvrant toute la Bretagne du Sud et faisant pendant à la Domnonée sur le rivage Nord au VIe siècle ou VIIe siècle.

Formation de la Bretagne

Au IXe siècle, il semble que le nom de Poher (pour Pou-Caer = Pays de la Ville ou Pays du Château ou Pays de Carhaix) se soit substitué à celui de Cornouaille. Par la suite, il fut réservé à la vallée de l'Aulne, dont la capitale était Carhaix.

À la fin du IXe siècle, le comté féodal de Cornouaille reprend le nom de l'ancien royaume. Sa dynastie accède au trône ducal, il passa à l'évêque de Quimper qui devient comte-évêque de Cornouaille jusqu'au XIe siècle où deux frères s'en répartissent les dignités.

La Cornouaille de nos jours

Composée de 218 communes (sur la base des communes actuelles), la Cornouaille comptait - au dernier recensement de 1999 - 456 307 habitants pour une superficie totale de 5 979 km².

Le nom a été repris officiellement en 2001 pour sa partie au sud d'une ligne Châteaulin-Scaër pour la circonscription de programmation « Pays de Cornouaille » composée de 112 communes (loi Voynet, 1999)

Share this panorama