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Hirve park, Tallinn
Tallinn

Hirve Park is one of the most dendrologically diverse parks in Tallinn, and certainly one with an interesting history: it is considered one of the symbols of the restoration of Estonia's independence. It was here that in 1987 people came to openly protest against the Soviet occupation for the first time, presenting the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact between Soviet Russia and Nazi Germany. Famous nationalist meetings were held here calling for Estonia's freedom and playing a huge role in changing the country's history.

Did you know...?

*The park is included on the UNESCO World Heritage List along with Tallinn's Old Town

*102 different species of tree grow here.

Source: VisitEstonia.com

Copyright: Andrew Bodrov
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 15000x7500
Taken: 13/10/2013
Uploaded: 15/10/2013
Updated: 02/06/2014
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Tags: hirve park; tallinn; estonia; autumn; unesco
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