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Hong Kong Kowloon Diamond Hill Nan Lian Garden Dragon Gate Tower Silver Strand The Mill
Hong Kong

Hong Kong Kowloon Diamond Hill Nan Lian Garden Dragon Gate Tower Silver Strand The Mill

Nan Lian Garden is situated at Diamond Hill of Kowloon, taking in the full view of southeast Kowloon. The Garden and the Chi Lin Nunnery to its north together back into the sprawling northern mountain range. Hammer Hill Road borders the Garden on the east, Lung Cheung Road on the south, and Hollywood Plaza, a large shopping mall, on its west. The Garden opens to the west. An MTR station is just opposite the Main Gate.

The Garden is a designated public park, with an area of 35,000 square metres. It was designed and built by the Chi Lin Nunnery, entrusted by the Government, and is opened to the public in November 2006. It is currently managed by the Chi Lin Nunnery, also entrusted by the Government.

The Garden is built in the classical style of the Tang Dynasty (618 AD to 907 AD), on the blue print of Jiangshouju, the only Tang landscape garden the original layout of which can still be placed and traced today, and the shape of which bears a significant resemblance to the Garden site. Hills and rocks, waters, plants and timber structures are built and arranged according to classical Tang style and rules, accommodating the local environment, and the best view of the sprawling mountain range to the north is taken as the seamless backdrop.

The Garden is a Tang garden built in modern times, its architecture and landscaping reminiscent of nature and conducive towards a sense of serenity and tranquility, an ambience in which visitors may enjoy a moment of leisure and peace of mind, whilst reflecting on the profound richness of classical Chinese culture, right in the midst of the urban city hustle and bustle. It is hoped this will help promote the knowledge of and interest in classical Chinese culture.

Long Man Lou (Dragon Gate Tower)

Lou, in Chinese, is a building with two or more storeys, its height providing a vantage point for surveying the surrounding landscape.

Long Man Lou

A green three-storeyed modern structure in the eastern part of the garden by the Pine East Path. From here one sees the whole garden unfold like a landscape scroll.

Down the front glass façade of the lower floor of the building cascades a curtain of water, the Silver Strand, making the view from within dance with movement and light. Another silver strand of water falls down the side façade, and merges with the cascade in the cool Moon Wash, where the moon visits in quiet nights and frolics with the ripples.

On top of the Long Men Lou stands the Wisdom Pavilion, a Tang-styled hexagonal wooden pavilion, in the midst of shrubs and flowers looking over westward, taking on the grandeur scene which is the Garden, larger than the denomination of its borders and boundaries   . The style of the structure is now rare in China. In the Pavilion is a bronze bell; its mellow boom is a call for reflection and enfolds in harmony the world of man and nature.

Long Man Lou provides a pleasant venue for dining on healthy vegetarian cuisine.

Silver Strand

Down the front glass façade of Long Men Lou cascades a curtain of water, the Silver Strand, making the view from within dance with movement and light. Down the side façade dances another silver strand of water, merging with the cascade in the Moon Wash, where the moon visits in quiet nights and frolics with the ripples.

The Mill

Further up the path stands the Mill, a rustic cottage, a watermill.  The Mill is thatch-roofed, built in an unpretentious and simple style, in reminiscence of a traditional farm house, standing out in an otherwise scholarly oriented setting.

Dripping in the Moon Wash where the moon visits and rests in serene nights, the turning wheel drives the water-powered pestle and mortar housed inside the Mill for husking beans and rice. These tools were an essential part of Chinese agricultural life and are still used in some parts of the country today. They are a reminder of our cultural roots. An innovative addition is a mechanical lift which raises the heavy millstone for easy cleaning.

A leisurely amble round the Mill leads to the Tea Hill where young plants flourish.  A short pause here under the shaded shed punctuates the long stroll here along the winding path.  Visitors are refreshed and ready to take the final yardage of the rewarding journey round the Garden.

Copyright: Photoguy - kenneth wong
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 8964x4482
Uploaded: 08/01/2012
Updated: 05/09/2014
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Tags: diamond hill; garden; temple; gallery; museum; timber architecture; gate tower; mill; strand; waterfall; pool; pond
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Overview and HistoryHong Kong sits on the south coast of China, on the Pearl River Delta. It's got a population of more than seven million people and is one of the most densely populated places on earth. It also appears to be putting into place the template for population management, which cities around the world will be implementing as soon as they can afford it. More on that later.Archaeological evidence dates human activity beneath present-day Hong Kong back to the stone age. The area was first settled by people from the mainland during the Han dynasty, around the beginning of the common era (the P.C. term for when B.C. changed to A.D. Whoa!)For hundreds of years, Hong Kong was a small fishing community and haven for travelers, with a few pirates here and there. Then whitey showed up.Western influence reached China at the beginning of the 15th century, when all those great explorers in boats were cruising for loot in strange and mysterious places. Tea and silk were the commodities connecting eastern Europe to China, and Hong Kong was known as a safe harbor through which to pass. When you're carrying the Queen's tea, it's especially important to avoid ARRRRRRguments with pirates. Hyuk hyuk hyuk.Seriously folks -- in the eighteenth century Britain was doing a booming business with China, offering Indian opium to balance their extensive purchases of fine porcelains and everything else. The opium was ordained to be for medicinal purposes only, of course.Well, as you may imagine, the Chinese got sick of opium fiends junking up the place, so they attempted to stop the British suppliers, to no avail. The Opium Wars resulted and ended with China ceding Hong Kong to the British, in fear of their massive naval power. This took place in the year 1841.Colonization soon followed, Hong Kong shot up in value as an international port, and its population increased dramatically. In 1898 Britain acquired additional territories on a 99 year lease -- expiring in 1997. Does that year sound familiar? Read on.In the 20th century Hong Kong changed hands several times. The British surrendered it to Japan during World War Two, then took it back after Japan's defeat, then gave it to China later. Immediately following the war, Hong Kong served as a safe haven for hundreds of thousands of Chinese refugees, while the Chinese National Government was losing its civil war against communist leadership.The population of Hong Kong exploded as corporations seeking to escape Chinese isolationism arrived and set up shop. Cheap labor in the textile and manufacturing industries steadily built up the economy and ensured foreign investment. By the end of the 20th century Hong Kong had become a financial mammoth offering banking services to the world.In 1997 Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule with a few stipulations in place to guarantee its economic autonomy, as much as possible. The phrase "one country, two systems" was coined by the Chinese to describe the relationship between the mainland and Hong Kong.Getting ThereWell, where do you want to get to from the Hong Kong International Airport? There are ferries servicing six mainland ports in the Pearl River Delta Region. Airport Express Railway connects directly to downtown Hong Kong, and it has been rated the best airport in the world multiple times.The Airport Express Railway will get you into Hong Kong in about an hour, for $100. Public buses cost $10 and take a little longer. For direct service to your hotel you can take one of the hotel's private buses ($120+) or a taxi ($300+). As you can see, waiting time is optional for those who can afford it.Here's a little blurb on travel times, with further information for access to nearby cities (cross-boundary transport).TransportationGrab an Octopus card when you arrive. Octopus is the world's first electronic ticket-fare card system and the Hong Kong public transportation system is the world leader in people-moving. 90% of Hong Kongers get around on public transportation.Octopus covers the Airport Rail line, buses, ferries, the rapid-transit MTR network, supermarkets, fast food outlets, phone booths... It's how to get around the cashless economy.Nevermind the microchip built into it, you'll get used to having one of those on you at all times -- and soon they'll be internal! What do I mean? Many schools in Hong Kong even use the Octopus card to check attendance, because you read the card's data with an external scanner from a distance. This will the global norm soon. What if that chip is installed in your body? It's in the works baby!The hilly Hong Kong terrain also demands some special modes of transportation. If you've been to Pittsburgh, you may have some idea of how cool it is to ride a cable car up the side of a mountain, overlooking a majestic harbor and city. Multiply that by about ten thousand and you've got Hong Kong: vertical-travel trams, moving sidewalks, and the world's longest outdoor escalator system.People and CultureThe local currency is the Hong Kong dollar (HKD) which is pegged to the U.S. dollar. Official languages are Chinese and English.  You're on your own, baby!  Dive into the swarming, throbbing, pulsing, crawling and teeming mix!Things to do & RecommendationsThe Peak Tower and its shopping Galleria are the biggest tourist attraction in Hong Kong so don't miss it.Cool off in the Kowloon Park public indoor swimming pool!After that, go see what's happening at the Hong Kong Fringe Club, a non-profit organisation which puts together exhibitions for international artists and performers.Organize sports fans flock to the Hong Kong Stadium, but there's good news for disorganized sportistas too -- Mountain biking is now legal in the parks! Have at it, baby!All this excitement is going to make you hungry. Springtime is traditionally the time to celebrate seafood, summer is for fruits, and winter steams with hot pot soups to keep you warm.The best thing to do is go and find some dim sum. Dozens of plates of tasty small items, sort of like sushi but it's cooked, and the varieties are endless.Since you won't be able to walk down the street without complete and total sensory overload, I'll just whap in the Hong Kong tourist board's guide to dining and leave you to your intuition.Good luck, take it slow and above all -- DON'T SPIT OUT YOUR CHEWING GUM ON THE SIDEWALK. Gum is legal but there's a $500 fine for intentional littering. Enjoy!Text by Steve Smith.