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Keihukuji Temple in Himeji, Japan
Japan

Keihukuji is a Soto Zen training temple which was established in Sakata-machi (a half mile to the south-east of the castle) by Terumasa IKEDA who renovated Himeji Castle during 1601-1609. Then moved to current place (a half mile to the west of the castle) in 1749 by Tadazumi SAKAI, the lord of Himeji who ruled Himeji area during 1749-1772.

Behind the temple is a hill. On the top of the hill, there is the abandoned tomb of Akinori MATSUDAIRA who governed Himeji during 1741-1748.

Copyright: Kengo shimizu
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 8000x4000
Uploaded: 01/05/2011
Updated: 25/04/2014
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