0 Likes

Nagusa Shrine
Japan

This panorama was taken in front of "Nagusa-Jinja" (Nagusa Shrine).

The waterfall is 72 m (236 ft.) high and 3 m (10 ft.) wide.

Nothing about this shrine is known because there is almost no documents about it.

However, the fact that the shrine has a nameplate of Dragon and that there are several waterfalls around here suggest the shrine has something to do with rain-making rituals.

View More »

Copyright: Kengo Shimizu
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Uploaded: 13/02/2012
Updated: 25/04/2014
Views:

...


Tags: japan; shrine
comments powered by Disqus

Kengo Shimizu
Nagusa Waterfall
Kengo Shimizu
Kitchen of an 18th Century Japanese Residence
Kengo Shimizu
Living Room of an 18th Century Japanese Residence
Kengo Shimizu
Entrance of an 18th Century Japanese Residence
Kengo Shimizu
View from the Ruins of Tsurui Castle
Kengo Shimizu
View from the Top of Mt.Myojin
Kengo Shimizu
View from the Ruins of Tsuneya Castle
Kengo Shimizu
Earth Floor of the Oldest Japanese Residence
Kengo Shimizu
Living Room of the Oldest Japanese Residence
Kengo Shimizu
One of the Oldest Residence in Existence in Japan
朝日 信孝
Aisaka tunnel
Kengo Shimizu
Frozen Waterfall in Mt.Kasagata
Ronald Tichelaar
Kitesurfing at the cliff of Mirns
Jedsada Puangsaichai
Conservation Culture Field, Sirijit Park, Kamphaeng Phet, Near Infrared
Richard Chesher
Ouvea Tour Lekiny Cliffs
Noel Jenkins
St Nicholas Priory, Exeter. The Kitchen
Christof Martin - pfalz360.de
Lac des Quatre Cantons
Willy Kaemena
Szent Istvan Bazilika
Andrea Biffi
piazza del Duomo a Trento - Italy
Jann Lipka
Rikstelefon payphone booth
Jedsada Puangsaichai
Sirijit Park, Kamphaeng Phet, Near Infrared
Jedsada Puangsaichai
Wat Chang Rob, Kamphaeng Phet Historical Park, Near Infrared
Stefan Bock
Dschungelpalast Zoo Hannover
CHRISTIAN DEL ROSARIO
Stockholm City Hall Dance Hall
Kengo Shimizu
The summit of Mt.Hyonosen in Hyogo, Japan
Kengo Shimizu
View from Tombi-Iwa (Kite Rock) on Mt.Tengadai
Kengo Shimizu
View from Mt.Sannomaru in Hyogo, Japan
Kengo Shimizu
Kitchen of a Rich Farmer's House in 19th Century
Kengo Shimizu
View from Mt.Furisode (aka Mt.Hamaguri)
Kengo Shimizu
View from Ruins of Komayama Castle
Kengo Shimizu
Semba Hontokuji Temple
Kengo Shimizu
Driver's Cabin of D51 Steam Locomotive
Kengo Shimizu
To-bai-kaku (Chinese Plum Tower) in Mitsu Narural Park
Kengo Shimizu
Observaion Deck in Akashi Kaikyo Bridge
Kengo Shimizu
Lookout on Mt.Kunimiyama
Kengo Shimizu
View from Mt. Otori in Kamigori Town
More About Japan

The eight islands of Japan sprang into existence through Divine Intervention.The first two gods who came into existence were Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto, the Exalted Male and Exalted Female. It was their job to make the land for people to live on.They went to the bridge between heaven and earth and, using a jewel-encrusted halberd, Izanagi and Izanami churned up the sea into a frothy foam. As salty drips of water fell from the tip of the halberd the first island was formed. Its name was Onogoro.So far, so good. But when Izanagi and Izanami first met on their island, Izanami spoke to Isanagi without being spoken to first. Since she was the female, and this was improper, their first union created badly-formed offspring who were sent off into the sea in boats.The next time they met, Izanagi was sure to speak first, ensuring the proper rules were followed, and this time they produced eight children, which became the islands of Japan.I'm sure you did not fail to miss the significance of this myth for the establishment of Japanese formal society.At present, Japan is the financial capital of Asia. It has the second largest economy in the world and the largest metropolitan area (Tokyo.)Technically there are three thousand islands making up the Japanese archipelago. Izanagi and Izanami must have been busy little devils with their jewelled halberd...Japan's culture is highly technical and organized. Everything sparkles and swooshes on silent, miniaturized mechanisms.They're a world leader in robotics, and the Japanese have the longest life-expectancy on earth.Text by Steve Smith.