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Nemophila flowers in Hitachi Kaihin Park
Japan

In spring, the park, Hitachi Kaihin park is brightly decorated with blue Nemophila flowers. Many people come to this small hill to see the blue. In autumn, this same hill will be tinged with red leaves of Kochia trees.

Copyright: Taro Tsubomura
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 13000x6500
Uploaded: 29/04/2014
Updated: 19/09/2014
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Tags: flowers; park; ibaraki
  • Japan flowers 3 months ago
    Great Place Must Visit.
  • SinghBoy 3 months ago
    s. Many peo
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