Nonnemattweiher - A Lake from the las...
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Panoramic photo by Carsten T. Rees EXPERT Taken 18:11, 20/06/2011 - Views loading...

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Nonnemattweiher - A Lake from the last Glacial Era - Kleines Wiesental, Black Forest, Germany – View 3

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The "Nonnenmattweiher" is a small corrie lake. Its bed was formed by a glacier during the last ice age that ended approximately 10,000 years ago. In Medieval times the lake silted up and became a moor. In 1758 a dam was built to hold back the water and run a mill that was located further down the valley. Then something very special happened. The flooded moor floated up and formed a swimming peat island. On March 1, 1920, after prolonged heavy rains, the dam broke and the flood devastated most of the upper part of the adjoining "Kleines Wiesental" valley. In June, 1934, a new dam was officially opened (or closed rather) and the moor once again floated up and an even larger swimming peat island formed itself.

"Nonne" is also a word for a nun and there is an old lore explaining the name of this place accordingly: It is said that there was an old monastery on that very location which, after God's judgement, was drowned in the lake together with all its inhabiting nuns.

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A: Nonnemattweiher - A Lake from the last Glacial Era - Kleines Wiesental, Black Forest, Germany – View 1

by Carsten T. Rees, 170 meters away

The "Nonnenmattweiher" is a small corrie lake. Its bed was formed by a glacier during the last ice ag...

Nonnemattweiher - A Lake from the last Glacial Era - Kleines Wiesental, Black Forest, Germany – View 1

B: Nonnemattweiher - A Lake from the last Glacial Era - Kleines Wiesental, Black Forest, Germany – View 2

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The "Nonnenmattweiher" is a small corrie lake. Its bed was formed by a glacier during the last ice ag...

Nonnemattweiher - A Lake from the last Glacial Era - Kleines Wiesental, Black Forest, Germany – View 2

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This panorama was taken in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany

This is an overview of Germany

Germany? Before the beginning there was Ginnungagap, an empty space of nothingness, filled with pure creative power. (Sort of like the inside of my head.)

And it ends with Ragnarok, the twilight of the Gods. In between is much fighting, betrayal and romance. Just as a good Godly story should be.

Heroes have their own graveyard called Valhalla. Unfortunately we cannot show you a panorama of it at this time, nor of the lovely Valkyries who are its escort service.

Hail Odin, wandering God wielding wisdom and wand! Hail Freya, hail Tyr, hail Thor!

Odin made the many lakes and the fish in them. In his traverses across the lands he caused there to be the Mulheim Bridge in Cologne, as did he make the Mercury fountain, Mercury being of his nature.

But it is to the mighty Thor that the Hammering Man gives service.

Between the time of the Nordic old ones and that of modern Frankfort there may have been a T.Rex or two on the scene. At least some mastodons for sure came through for lunch, then fell into tar pits to become fossils for us to find.

And there we must leave you, O my most pure and holy children.

Text by Steve Smith.

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