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Radio Kootwijk, former transmission building
Netherlands

The former long-wave radio transmission building of Radio Kootwijk on the sandy fields of the Veluwe. The architecture of the massive concrete bunker-like structure was inspired on the Egyptian Sphinx.

Copyright: Coos Dam
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Uploaded: 05/03/2012
Updated: 11/08/2014
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Tags: radio; kootwijk; transmission; veluwe; sand
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