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Dampflokmuseum Camlik 9
Turkey

The railway station of Camlik had been built in 1856 by the Britains. It's on the way from Izmir to Aydin. Not far away from the station there was a tunnel that broke down. This caused a diversion of the railroad and a new station. A railway enthusiast made it possible to get the old broken locomotives and establish a museum. (By the way: the museum is promoted as the biggest European locomotive museum, although it's geographically in Asia. That tells a lot about the way how Turks feel: as European.)

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Copyright: Heiner Straesser Der Panoramafotograf.Com
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 8084x4042
Taken: 15/08/2009
Uploaded: 12/05/2010
Updated: 29/05/2014
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Tags: steam engine; railway; museum; turkey; anatolia
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