Ruins of Aga castle
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Panoramic photo by hironobu honjyo EXPERT Taken 00:43, 13/07/2013 - Views loading...

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Ruins of Aga castle

The World > Asia > Japan

Tags: nature

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英賀城跡の土塁。播磨侵攻にかかった織田軍の勢いを食い止めるため、英賀の港に上陸した毛利方の軍勢五千に対した官兵衛が率いる手勢は五百。官兵衛の指示により地元の非戦闘員に太鼓やのぼりを持たせて織田方の援軍と思わせ、毛利軍に籠城する英賀城の支援を断念させた。

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This panorama was taken in Japan

This is an overview of Japan

The eight islands of Japan sprang into existence through Divine Intervention.

The first two gods who came into existence were Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto, the Exalted Male and Exalted Female. It was their job to make the land for people to live on.

They went to the bridge between heaven and earth and, using a jewel-encrusted halberd, Izanagi and Izanami churned up the sea into a frothy foam. As salty drips of water fell from the tip of the halberd the first island was formed. Its name was Onogoro.

So far, so good. But when Izanagi and Izanami first met on their island, Izanami spoke to Isanagi without being spoken to first. Since she was the female, and this was improper, their first union created badly-formed offspring who were sent off into the sea in boats.

The next time they met, Izanagi was sure to speak first, ensuring the proper rules were followed, and this time they produced eight children, which became the islands of Japan.

I'm sure you did not fail to miss the significance of this myth for the establishment of Japanese formal society.

At present, Japan is the financial capital of Asia. It has the second largest economy in the world and the largest metropolitan area (Tokyo.)

Technically there are three thousand islands making up the Japanese archipelago. Izanagi and Izanami must have been busy little devils with their jewelled halberd...

Japan's culture is highly technical and organized. Everything sparkles and swooshes on silent, miniaturized mechanisms.

They're a world leader in robotics, and the Japanese have the longest life-expectancy on earth.

Text by Steve Smith.

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