Rundale Palace In The Yard
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Panoramic photo by Saulius Baublys Taken 17:44, 06/08/2011 - Views loading...

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Rundale Palace In The Yard

The World > Europe > Latvia

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Rundāle Palace (Latvian: Rundāles pils; German: Schloss Ruhental, formerly also Ruhenthal and Ruhendahl) is one of the two major baroque palaces built in the 18th century for the Dukes of Courland in what is now Latvia, the other being Jelgava Palace. It is situated at Pilsrundāle, 12 km west of Bauska.

History



Latvia Rundāle palace

It was constructed in the 1730s to a design by Bartolomeo Rastrelli as a summer residence of Ernst Johann von Biron, the Duke of Courland. Following Biron's fall from grace, the palace stood empty until the 1760s, when Rastrelli returned to complete its interior decoration.

After Duchy of Courland and Semigallia was absorbed by the Russian Empire in 1795, Catherine the Great presented the palace to Count Valerian Zubov, the youngest brother of her lover, Prince Platon Zubov. He spent his declining years there after the death of Valerian Zubov in 1804. His young widow, Thekla Walentinowicz, a local landowner's daughter, remarried Count Shuvalov, thus bringing the palace to the Shuvalov family, with whom it remained until the German occupation in World War I when the German army established a hospital and a commandant's office there.



Rundāle Palace by Pudelek

The palace suffered serious damage in 1919 during the Latvian War of Independence. In 1920, part of the premises were occupied by the local school. In 1933, Rundāle Palace was taken over by the State History Museum of Latvia. It was dealt a serious blow after the World War II, when the grain storehouse was set up in the premises and later, the former duke's dining room was transformed into the school's gymnasium. Only in 1972 permanent Rundāle Palace Museum was established.[1]

The palace is one of the major tourist destinations in Latvia. It is also used for the accommodation of notable guests, such as the leaders of foreign nations. The palace and the surrounding gardens are now a museum.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rund%C4%81le_Palace

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Nearby images in Latvia

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A: Duke's Reception Room in Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Duke's Reception Room in Rundale Palace, Latvia

B: Baroque dance reenactors at the Golden Hall in Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Baroque dance reenactors at the Golden Hall in Rundale Palace, Latvia

C: President of Latvia Valdis Zatlers at the 274th anniversary of Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Rundale Palace is a true treasury of Baroque and Rococo art in Latvia. The palace with an adjacent Fr...

President of Latvia Valdis Zatlers at the 274th anniversary of Rundale Palace, Latvia

F: Scenes from the past, Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Rundale Palace is a true treasury of Baroque and Rococo art in Latvia. The palace with an adjacent Fr...

Scenes from the past, Rundale Palace, Latvia

G: Golden Hall in Rundale Palace, Latvia

by Vil Muhametshin, 50 meters away

Rundale Palace is a true treasury of Baroque and Rococo art in Latvia. The palace with an adjacent Fr...

Golden Hall in Rundale Palace, Latvia

H: Reconstruction of the 18th century Duchess' dress at Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Reconstruction of the 18th century Duchess' dress at Rundale Palace, Latvia

I: Duchess' boudoir, Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Duchess' boudoir, Rundale Palace, Latvia

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Text by Steve Smith.

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