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Syrenka statue on Old Town Market square in Warsaw
Warsaw

The Coat of Arms of Warsaw consists of a syrenka ("little mermaid") in a red field. Polish syrenka is cognate with siren, but she is more properly a fresh-water mermaid called “Melusina.” This imagery has been in use since at least the mid-14th century

Copyright: Marcin Klaban
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 7290x3645
Uploaded: 14/05/2009
Updated: 25/09/2014
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Tags: warsaw; poland; monuments
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