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Tallinn Central Library (ground floor)
Tallinn

Tallinn Central Library is a public library and the library serves all the inhabitants and visitors of Tallinn.

Our library has 3 departments, 17 branch libraries and a mobile library. Readers only need one unified library card or their Estonian ID-card for using our services in any of our departments or branches.

In 2012 we registered 72 514 readers who visited our libraries 1 056 919 times and borrowed home 1 800 000 documents. 63.7% of the homelendings is made up of fiction. By the end of the year 2012 there were 1 039 319 documents total in our library. Our web site was visited 419 341 times.

Our readers: 20,8% (15 184) below 17 years old, 79,2% adults.

Visitors: 19% (183 227) below 17 years old, 81 % adults.

Borrowers: 10,2% (166 287) below 17 years old, 89,8% adults.

We have set up 208 modern computer workplaces for our readers in our library.

Source: www.keskraamatukogu.ee

Copyright: Andrew bodrov
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 15000x7500
Uploaded: 01/02/2014
Updated: 02/06/2014
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Tags: tallinn; estonia
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