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The Zubovs’ room - Animated history of the Rundale palace, Latvia
Latvia

The Zubovs’ room shows the interior of the Palace around 1800 when its new owner Count Valerian Zubov furnished the Palace anew with neoclassical style furniture he had brought from St. Petersburg. The room exhibits portraits of the Zubovs and their patroness Empress Catherine the Great of Russia.

Copyright: Vil Muhametshin
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 13872x6936
Uploaded: 24/05/2013
Updated: 25/06/2014
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Tags: history; art; baroque; rastrelli; rundāles pils; latvija
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