Top of the hill, Mount Panorama, Bath...
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Panoramic photo by fotografiejohneggers EXPERT Taken 09:57, 29/04/2011 - Views loading...

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Top of the hill, Mount Panorama, Bathurst

The World > Australia

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This panorama was taken at Brock's skyline at Mount Panorama in Bathurst. It is possibly the best known Australian car racing track, and hosts the Bathurst 12 hour car race every February and also the Bathurst 1000 in October, when many car racing fans make the trip to Bathurst, while others are glued to their TV's most of the weekend. Some of the better known drivers include Peter Brock, Allan Moffat, Jason Bargwanna, David Brabham, Dick Johnson, Denny Hulme and many others. It has claimed the lives of 16 drivers.

When not being used for car races, the track is comprised of 'normal' streets, open to the public and subject to the usual road rules. Many a 'would be' racer has fallen foul of the law here.

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This panorama was taken in Australia

This is an overview of Australia

There are no kangaroos in Austria.

We're talking about Australia, the world's smallest continent. That being cleared up, let's dive right in!

Australia is a sovereign state under the Commonwealth of Nations, which is in turn overseen by Queen Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, Queen of Australia and Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth.

The continent was first sighted and charted by the Dutch in 1606. Captain James Cook of Britain came along in the next century to claim it for Britain and name it "New South Wales." Shortly thereafter it was declared to be a penal colony full of nothing but criminals and convicts, giving it the crap reputation you may have heard at your last cocktail party.

This rumor ignores 40,000 years of pre-European human history, especially the Aboriginal concept of Dreamtime, an interesting explanation of physical and spiritual reality.

The two biggest cities in Australia are Sydney and Melbourne. Sydney is more for business, Melbourne for arts. But that's painting in very broad strokes. Take a whirl around the panoramas to see for yourself!

Text by Steve Smith.

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