0 Likes

Urgup Pasabaglari
Cappadocia
Copyright:
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 6000x3000
Uploaded: 23/05/2013
Updated: 14/06/2013
Views: 308
comments powered by Disqus

Roberto Scavino
Jurassic beasts in Paşabağ, Cappadocia
Roberto Scavino
Paşabağ, the Fairy Courtyard
Roberto Scavino
Paşabağ, walking among Fairy Chimneys
Pasabag_Panorama
Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com
Pasabag
Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com
Pasabag2 kappadokien turkey
Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com
Cappadocia, Turkey
Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com
Cappadocia, Turkey
Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com
Zelve 3, Cappadocia, Turkey
Heiner Straesser - derPanoramafotograf.com
Zelve 2, Cappadocia, Turkey
Rami Saarikorpi
Sunset
Renzo Falconi
Diaccia Botrona-bridge-
Thomas Schwarz
Wiesbaden Lutherkirche Portal
Lars Gabrysch
Domstiftsgut Moetzow-Potsdam-Mittelmark-Brandenburg-Germany-Europe
Willy Kaemena
Capela de São Filipe - Pousada de Setubal
Ola Heloe
Reinstind
panoramas-thailand.com
Provincial building in Nathon Koh Samui
Jeff Fillmore
Welcome to my Treehouse
Vasilis Triantafyllou
Moon Eclipse 15 June 2011 Platamon Greece
Jens Remus
Double Arch
Kayseri Erkilet Dadag
Urgup Pasabaglari
kayseri_night_360
Kayseri Meydan 360
meydan genel
Pasabag_Panorama
akkayabaglari
Avanos Meydan
Urgup Temenni Tepe
Urgup_Meydan_Panorama
More About Cappadocia

Cappadocia is a part of central Turkey. Eruptions of several volcanoes (e.g. Erciyes Dag, Hasan Dag) had covered the area with tuff. Erosion dug valleys and created an uncountable number of different shaped rocks. The tuff's ability to store water made the valleys much more fertile than the higher surroundings. After the arrival of the first people, they soon started to dig caves into the soft stone. By the time they developed the ability to dig cities into the underground with tunnels of several kilometers. A sophisticated pipe- and tunnel-system cared for fresh air and water, to enable the people to hide from enemies for a long time. In the 5th century hermits started to settle in the valleys and to paint their caves. In the next centuries more and more hermits and monks arrived and a rich cave-architecture with colourfull wallpaintings developed. The most famous are the churches of Goereme and the Peristrema Valley (=Ihlara Valley) between Ihlara and Selime. Today thousands of tourists from all over the world are visiting the area.