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Ferrocarril de Sóller - Palma Railway Station
Mallorca

Wikipedia:

The Ferrocarril de Sóller (Sóller Railway in English and often abbreviated to F.S.) is a long-distance railway and the name for the company which operates the electrified 914mm gauge tracks running between the towns of Sóller and Palma on the Spanish island of Mallorca (stopping at various smaller towns such as Bunyola and Son Sardina). The historic electric train takes a route north from the capital across the plains, winding through mountains and 13 tunnels of the Serra de Tramuntana, finally ending in the large railway station of the northern town of Sóller. Work began on the railway in 1911 on the profits of the orange and lemon trade, which at the time was booming. The famous train is now not only a mode of transport between these two key Mallorcan settlements, but also an attraction in itself. The line is closed in December and January for annual maintenance.

Copyright: Jan koehn
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 15008x7504
Caricate: 30/07/2010
Aggiornato: 30/05/2014
Numero di visualizzazioni:

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Tags: fs; railway; palma; soller; electric train
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