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The House Of Tsar Peter The Great

The House Of Tsar Peter The Great. Vologda. May 2011.

Description From Wiki:

The cabin of Peter the Great (Russian: Domik Petra I or Domik Petra Pervogo or Domik Petra Velikogo) is a small wooden house which was the first St Petersburg "palace" of Tsar Peter the Great.


The log cabin was constructed in three days in May 1703,[1] by soldiers of the Semyonovskiy Regiment.[2] At that time, the new St Petersburg was described as "a heap of villages linked together, like some plantation in the West Indies".[3] The date of its construction is now considered to mark the foundation of the city.

The design is a combination of an izba, a traditional Russian countryside house typical of the 17th century, and the Tsar's beloved Dutch Baroque, later to evolve into the Petrine Baroque. Peter built similar domiki elsewhere in Russia - for example, in Voronezh, and Vologda.

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Copyright: Dmitry O Belov
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 13222x6611
Taken: 11/05/2011
Caricate: 12/05/2011
Aggiornato: 10/03/2015
Numero di visualizzazioni:

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Tags: vologda; 2011; house; spring; museum
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Vologda was first mentioned in Novgorod chronicles for 1147, when Saint Gerasimus found a church and village already standing there. Surrounded by impassable woods, the settlement was inhabited by Novgorodians who pulled the ships from a tributary of theVolga to a tributary of the Northern Dvina, thus making possible navigation from the White Sea to the Caspian. In 1273 the city was ravaged by a Mongol raid. It was not until 1412, when the area was ceded by Novgorod Republic to Muscovy, that the town acquired any measure of importance. The princes of Muscovy made Vologda their outpost in the North. By the end of the century, Vologda eclipsed the ancient centre of that region, Belozersk. Its commercial importance further increased when the Muscovy Company started its operations in Russia.