UDG students at Lovćen
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UDG students at Lovćen

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Lovćen

Lovćen National Park
Mausoleum of Njegoš
Lovćen National Park


Lovćen (Montenegrin: Lovćen, Ловћен, pronounced [lɔ̂ːʋtɕɛn]) is a mountain and national park in southwestern Montenegro.

The Mount Lovćen rises from the borders of the Adriatic basin closing the long ang twisting bays of Boka Kotorska and making the hinterland to the coastal town of Kotor. The mountain has two imposing peaks, Štirovnik (1,749 m) and Jezerski vrh (1,657 m).

The mountain slopes are rocky, with numerous fissures, pits and deep depressions giving its scenery a specific look. Standing on the border between two completely different natural wholes, the sea and the mainland, Lovćen is under the influence of both climates. The specific connection of the life conditions has stipulated the development of the different biological systems. There are 1158 plant species on Lovćen, out of which four are endemic.


National park

National Park encompasses the central and the highest part of Lovćen mountain massif and covers an area of 62.20 km². It was proclaimed a national park in 1952. Besides Lovćen's natural beauties, the national park was established to protect rich historical, cultural and architectural heritage of the area.

Lovćen's area abounds in numerous elements of national construction. The old houses and village guvna are authentic as well as the cottages in katuns – summer settlements of cattlebreeders.

A particular architectural relic worth mentioning is Lovćen's serpentine road winding uphill from Kotor to the village of Njeguši, where the birth house of Montenegrin royal family of Petrović is situated.


Mausoleum Controversy

The biggest and most important monument of Lovćen national park is Njegoš's Mausoleum. The location for his burial place and the mausoleum at the summit of Jezerski vrh was chosen by Njegoš himself as his last wish.

However, Njegoš's express wish was to be buried in a small chapel which he had built in his lifetime. This was done, but the original chapel was destroyed when the Austro-Hungarian army invaded Montenegro in First World War (1916). Njegoš's remains were then transferred into Cetinje Monastery and buried in the chapel rebuilt by King Alexander in 1920s. Contrary to Njegoš's express wishes to be buried in that chapel, the then communist powers of Montenegro destroyed the chapel and built in its stead a monumental mausoleum in Viennese Secession style. The local Bishopric (Mitropolija) of the Serbian Orthodox Church opposed the destruction and even took the matter to the Constitutional Court, albeit with no success. The design was that of Ivan Meštrović who, although world-famous, had never set foot on Lovćen.

The protests erupted in 1970 with many famous Yugoslav public figures, of both Montenegrin and non-Montenegrin origin, complaining of what they described as barbaric breaking of Njegoš's last will.

Lovćenac, a village in the Vojvodina named after the mountain by an influx of Montenegrins.

Text source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lov%C4%87en

Photo: Saša Stojanović

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Immagini nelle vicinanze di Montenegro

map

A: Njegošev mauzolej

di Saša Stojanović, 10 metri di distanza

Njegošev mauzolej

B: Njegos Mausoleum On Lovcen Mountain

di Marijan Marijanovic, 10 metri di distanza

Njegos Mausoleum on Jezerski peak (1657 m) on Lovcen mountain near Cetinje in Montenegro. Mousoleum i...

Njegos Mausoleum On Lovcen Mountain

C: Lovećen, Montenegro

di Saša Stojanović, 10 metri di distanza

LovćenFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaLovćen National ParkMausoleum of NjegošLovćen National Par...

Lovećen, Montenegro

D: Njegos Mausoleum ( from front side - april )

di Marijan Marijanovic, 20 metri di distanza

Njegos Mausoleum from front side.

Njegos Mausoleum ( from front side - april )

E: Njegos Mausoleum ( from front side in april)

di Marijan Marijanovic, 20 metri di distanza

Njegos Mousoleum in national park Lovcen near Cetinje, Montenegro.

Njegos Mausoleum ( from front side in april)

F: Lovcen - Matrix

di Marijan Marijanovic, 20 metri di distanza

Mausoleum on Lovcen near Cetinje.

Lovcen - Matrix

G: Lovćen tunel entry

di Saša Stojanović, 60 metri di distanza

Lovćen National Park known for its natural, cultural and historical characteristics. Located at the j...

Lovćen tunel entry

H: Njegos Mausoleum On Lovcen From Back Side In April

di Marijan Marijanovic, 70 metri di distanza

Njegos Mausoleum on Lovcen mountain near Cetinje. Boka Kotorska and Skadar Lake are near by.

Njegos Mausoleum On Lovcen From Back Side In April

I: Hiking Path Kotor-Lovcen

di Marijan Marijanovic, 960 metri di distanza

View on Lovcen from hiking path Kotor - Lovcen, october 2013. Lovcen is a mountain and national park ...

Hiking Path Kotor-Lovcen

J: Bay of Kotor

di Istvan Bozsik, 1.8 km di distanza

Bay of Kotor view from a rock beside the Lovćen mountain road, 1250 m above sea level. Over the Vrmac...

Bay of Kotor

Questo panorama è stato scattato in Montenegro, Europe

Questa è una vista generale di Europe

Europe is generally agreed to be the birthplace of western culture, including such legendary innovations as the democratic nation-state, football and tomato sauce.

The word Europe comes from the Greek goddess Europa, who was kidnapped by Zeus and plunked down on the island of Crete. Europa gradually changed from referring to mainland Greece until it extended finally to include Norway and Russia.

Don't be confused that Europe is called a continent without looking like an island, the way the other continents do. It's okay. The Ural mountains have steadily been there to divide Europe from Asia for the last 250 million years. Russia technically inhabits "Eurasia".

Europe is presently uniting into one political and economic zone with a common currency called the Euro. The European Union originated in 1993 and is now composed of 27 member states. Its headquarters is in Brussels, Belgium.

Do not confuse the EU with the Council of Europe, which has 47 member states and dates to 1949. These two bodies share the same flag, national anthem, and mission of integrating Europe. The headquarters of the Council are located in Strasbourg, France, and it is most famous for its European Court of Human Rights.

In spite of these two bodies, there is still no single Constitution or set of laws applying to all the countries of Europe. Debate rages over the role of the EU in regards to national sovereignty. As of January 2009, the Lisbon Treaty is the closest thing to a European Constitution, yet it has not been approved by all the EU states. 

Text by Steve Smith.

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