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One of the Oldest Residence in Existence in Japan
Japan

兵庫県姫路市安富町皆河にある「千年家」の外観です。

室町時代末期に建てられた農家で、昭和40年頃まで実際に人が住んでいました。

桁行14メートル、梁間3.8メートル、一重、入母屋造・茅葺

昭和45~46年、文化庁指導の下で解体修理が行われ、何度か改修されて使用されてきたこの建物は、建立当時の姿に復元されました。

Copyright: Kengo shimizu
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
送信日: 17/02/2012
更新日: 25/04/2014
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Tags: japan; residence
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