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Plenarsaal Deutscher Bundestag Reichstag Berlin
Berlin

Das Reichstagsgebäude (kurz: Reichstag; offiziell: Plenarbereich Reichstagsgebäude) in Berlin ist seit 1999 Sitz des Deutschen Bundestages. Auch die Bundesversammlung tritt hier seit 1994 in der Regel alle fünf Jahre zur Wahl des deutschen Bundespräsidenten zusammen.

Der Bau wurde von dem Architekten Paul Wallot 1884 bis 1894 im Stil der Neorenaissance im Ortsteil Tiergarten (heute zum Bezirk Mitte gehörend) errichtet. Er beherbergte bis 1918 den Reichstag des Deutschen Kaiserreichs und anschließend das Parlament der Weimarer Republik. Durch den Reichstagsbrand von 1933 und durch Auswirkungen des Zweiten Weltkriegs schwer beschädigt, wurde das Gebäude in den 1960er Jahren in modernisierter Form wiederhergestellt und von 1991 bis 1999 noch einmal grundlegend umgestaltet.
Die nachträglich konzipierte Kuppel hat sich zur vielbesuchten Attraktion und zu einem Wahrzeichen Berlins entwickelt. Besucher können das Gebäude durch das Westportal betreten. Nach einer Sicherheitskontrolle gelangen sie mit zwei Aufzügen zunächst auf das 24 Meter hoch gelegene, begehbare Dach (im hinteren Bereich der Dachterrasse befindet sich das kleine Restaurant „Käfer“). Die dort aufgelagerte Kuppel misst 38 Meter im Durchmesser, hat eine Höhe von 23,5 Meter und wiegt 1200 Tonnen. Ihr Stahlskelett besteht aus 24 senkrechten Rippen im Abstand von 15 Grad und 17 waagerechten Ringen mit einem Abstand von 1,65 Meter, verkleidet mit 3000 Quadratmeter Glas. An der Innenseite winden sich zwei um 180 Grad versetzte spiralförmige, ungefähr 1,8 Meter breite Rampen von jeweils 230 Meter Länge hinauf zu einer Aussichtsplattform 40 Meter über Bodenniveau – beziehungsweise wieder hinunter zur Dachterrasse. Die Scheitelhöhe der Kuppel liegt bei 47 Meter über dem Boden – deutlich niedriger als bei Paul Wallot. Täglich werden im Durchschnitt 8000 Besucher gezählt.

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reichstagsgebäude

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Copyright: Dieter Kik
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 8478x4239
送信日: 21/08/2010
更新日: 23/06/2014
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Tags: parliament; interieur; german
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