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Christmas table in Oktorp Farmstead at the Skansen open-air museum, Stockolm
Sweden

The Oktorp Farmstead (Oktorpsgården) comes from Halland. It shows what a farmstead in the flat countryside there looked like in the 1870s.


In front of the high seat there is a table and in front of the table a movable bench. But it was only on festive occasions that people ate at this table. On ordinary days the food was set out on a so-called chair-table close to the stove.
There are two built-in beds with curtains in the room, separated by a cupboard. It was here that farmer and his wife and the younger children slept. In winter the farm hands slept on benches in the kitchen quarters while in the summer they had their own sleeping quarters. Beneath the bed cupboard there was a space enclosed by a grill in which the ducks and hens were kept in the winter.

As the room appears at Skansen it has been decorated for a festive occasion. The walls and the ceiling have been draped with painted hangings and woven linen cloths. Normally the room did not look like this at all. But in southern Sweden it was not usual to have a separate room for parties. Instead, the living room was appropriately decorated for special occasions. Long painted hangings were fixed to the walls above the benches. Tapestries were woven by the women of the farm. The painted hangings, with Biblical motifs, were bought at markets or from itinerant salesmen. Behind the living room there are two further rooms, one of them furnished for the elderly grandmother Ingeborg. A tiled stove was erected in the room in the 19th century.

More information: http://www.skansen.se

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Copyright: Vil muhametshin
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 6000x3000
Geüpload: 17/01/2012
Geüpdatet: 25/06/2014
Keer bekeken:

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Tags: historical reenactment; oktorpsgarden; traditions; history; halland; sweden; sverige
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