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Sir Frederick Range
Australia

Once upon a time there was a man who went by the name Len Beadell, he was employed as a surveyor and his job was to survey and lead a group of people who were to be known as "The Gunbarrel Road Construction Party". These men were the ones who made many thousands of kilometres of access roads over many of Australia's Deserts during the 1950's and '60s. On building a road later named "The Sandy Blight Junction Road", Len decided that after having driven his Landrover to the summit of the Sir Fredrick Range that a side track should be bulldozed and perhaps graded to allow easier access. This would later help surveyors build the trig point at the summit to assist in mapping the mostly as yet unmapped country, but also Len seemed to have his heart quite set on making the Sandy Blight Junction Road a bit of a tourist attraction, which he succeeded quite well in.

Most of the Sandy Blight Junction Road is no longer maintained and the main track has been bypassed in places due to the original track being washed away. Certain sections are quite heavily corrigated. The photographer of this image visited the area in the peak tourist season, yet did not see another human for over 2 days whilst travelling in the Northern section of the road.

The Sandy Blight Junction Road skirts the Eastern edge of the Gibson Desert and bridges 2 "main" roads, the Great Central and the Gary Junction Road (the latter built by the same party), both of these roads are unsealed gravel roads. 

Copyright: David rowley
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 7000x3500
Geüpload: 10/07/2011
Geüpdatet: 12/06/2014
Keer bekeken:

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Tags: fredrick; range; sandy; blight; beadell; desert
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