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The Tarascas fount
The source of the Tarascas was built in 1937, in order to sympathize with the then President of Mexico, Gen. Lazaro Cardenas Del Rio, who had a residence in which we know today as the Institute of Youth and Michoacan, to be placed on the side of his house, became a seductive gift, which did his fascination with Indian culture and women. The source of cement and clay on wire, decorated with snails as a representation of man (in hieroglyphics native) declaring their hand crafted and three women embody a graceful Indian princesses: Atzimba, Erendira and Tzetzangari, managed to win people with its great symbolism. The controversial construction was not welcomed by citizens who objected to the image of naked ladies, however, eventually began to recognize and be proud of such beauty. Currently "The Tarascas" exemplify the feminine uniqueness Purhépecha and despite its many legends are an icon of our city, that every day becomes the main background of many photographs of foreign and domestic visitors, also serving as the company photos of recent graduates, establishing itself as one of the most fortified monuments of wisdom and tradition that make up the rich culture of our beautiful city of Morelia.
Copyright: Gerardo Sosa Gomez
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 6000x3000
Taken: 05/02/2011
Geüpload: 05/02/2011
Geüpdatet: 13/10/2014
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Tags: morelia; michoacan; mexico; tarascas; cuente; fount; woman
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