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Living Room of an 18th Century Japanese Residence
Japan

In the northern part of Himeji city that is famous for the world heritage "Himeji Castle" is an old house of Sano family. It is said that the residence was built in early 18th century.

Japanese houses have a large floor that is separated by traditional Japanese fusuma (papered sliding doors). The floor is covered by Tatami (mat made of rice straw).

The point of view is in a living room. The next room decorated with a hanging scroll and a Japanese flora art is a parlor.

The size of the living room is approximately 3.8 x 3.8 meters (12.5 x 12.5 ft). The parlor has the same size.

Copyright: Kengo Shimizu
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 10000x5000
Uploaded: 05/06/2011
Actualizat: 25/04/2014
Vizualizari:

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Tags: living room; japanese culture
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