Cappadocian Villages

For thousands of years Cappadocia is home of many peoples who immigrated and mixed with others. They brought many different cultures, which inspired each other and created something new. In everyday life these cultures find their expression in the archite

The name oft the village Güzelyurt means  "nice homeland". Until 1923, when all the Christians had to leave Anatolia, the village was home of a Greek population and called Gelveri. Today many Greek descendants of the former poulation visit the vil...
Until 1923 many Greek people lived in the village Suvermez (Floita), but not much survived from these times. Here is a decorated entrance and on the opposite side of the square the old Greek church, which had been used as a quarry.
Like in many other Cappadocian villages the Greek history of Tatlarin is still visible. The tuff rock in the background not only contains cave houses, but also an underground city and a church with frescoes from the 13th century.
Like in many other Cappadocian villages the Greek history of Tatlarin is still visible. A big tuff rock nearby not only contains cave houses, but also an underground city and a church with frescoes from the 13th century.
Like in many other Cappadocian villages the Greek history of Tatlarin is still visible. The tuff rock in the background not only contains cave houses, but also an underground city and a church with frescoes from the 13th century.
Like in many other Cappadocian villages the Greek history of Tatlarin is still visible. The big tuff rock not only contains cave houses, but also an underground city and a church with frescoes from the 13th century.
Like in many other Cappadocian villages the Greek history of Tatlarin is still visible. The big tuff rock not only contains cave houses, but also an underground city and a church with frescoes from the 13th century.
Uçhisar after sunset. This is one of the most fascinating villages in central Cappadocia.
This tuff rock is called "Tigraz Kale" and for many years people had lived here. It's just a few years since the last one has left his cave apartment. It is planned to change the rock into a museum.
This big tuff rock is called "Tigraz Kale" and for many years people had lived here. It's just a few years since the last one has left his cave apartment. It is planned to change the rock into a museum.
Originally the village of Germir (the old name is Kermira) had a mixed population of muslims, Armenians and Greek orthodox christians. There is only little to see from the formerly rich decorated stone houses.
Surp Stepanos in Germir, inner Anatolia: From the central square of the village is only the west wall of the Armenian church visible. Inside is an apse with a few wall paintings. The church is now an open space with a garden.
Between the rocks with the cave houses in Uçhisar, one of the most fascinating places in Cappadocia.