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Burg Rothenfels Portal und Amtshaus 2011
Franconia

The castle "Rothenfels" is eighty meters high on a cliff on the eastern edge of the “Spessart-forest”. The oldest parts of the castle go back to 1148th. Today the castle is used as a youth hostel and education center. The panorama shows the gate and the office building.

Nikon D5000 | Nikkor 18-135 | Panoramic Tripod Head homemade | 38 Pictures | ISO 200 | 1/350 sec. | F9,5 | 18mm | PTGui | PaintShop Pro

Copyright: Ackermann Ralf
Typ: Spherical
Upplösning: 10000x5000
Taken: 05/07/2011
Uppladdad: 05/07/2011
Uppdaterad: 20/03/2015
Visningar:

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Tags: church; main; bayern; cloister; cathedral; untermain; franken; unterfranken; mainfranken; franconia; germany; bavaria; freudenberg; wertheim; miltenberg; ruins; burg; ruine; radwanderweg; würzburg; aschaffenburg; rothenfels
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Mer om Franconia

Wikipedia: Franconia (German: Franken) is a region of Germany comprising the northern parts of the modern state of Bavaria, a small part of southern Thuringia, and a region in northeastern Baden-Württemberg called Heilbronn-Franken. The Bavarian part is made up of the administrative regions of Lower Franconia (Unterfranken), Middle Franconia (Mittelfranken), and Upper Franconia (Oberfranken).Franconia (like France) is named after the Germanic tribe of the Franks. This tribe played a major role after the breakdown of the Roman Empire and colonised large parts of medieval Europe.Modern day Franconia comprises only a very tiny and rather remote part of the settlement area of the ancient Franks. In German, Franken is used for both modern day Franconians and the historic Franks, which leads to some confusion. The historic Frankish Empire, Francia, is actually the common precursor of the Low Countries, France and Germany. In 843 the Treaty of Verdun led to the partition of Francia into West Francia (modern day France), Middle Francia (from the Low Countries along the Rhine valley to northern Italy) and East Francia (modern day Germany). Frankreich, the German word for "France", and Frankrijk, the Dutch word for "France"; literally mean "the Frankish Empire".