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Frozen Waterfall in Mt.Kasagata
Japan

This waterfall is called "Henmyo-no-Taki".

Henmyo was a name of a Buddhist monk who enshrined Cetaka near the sault in Edo period.

In winter, the waterfall gets frozen as in this panorama.
Apparently, the height is only 20 or 30 meters. The fact is that only the bottom half of the waterfall is visible.
Its overall height is 65 meters (213 ft.).

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Copyright: Kengo Shimizu
Typ: Spherical
Upplösning: 10000x5000
Uppladdad: 05/02/2012
Uppdaterad: 25/04/2014
Visningar:

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Tags: japan; waterfall; kasagata; henmyo
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