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上七軒「梅乃」Kyoto ochaya Umeno approach

梅乃   http://www.kyoto-umeno.com/

Kamishichiken is a district of northwest Kyoto, Japan. It is the oldest hanamachi (geisha district) in Kyoto, and is located just east of the Kitano Tenman-gū Shrine. The name Kamishichiken literally means "Seven Upper Houses." These refer to the seven teahouses built from the equipment and material leftover from the rebuilding of the Kitano Shrine in Muromachi era (1333–1573).

Kamishichiken is located in Kyoto’s Nishijin area, which is known for traditional hand-woven textiles. The quiet streets of Kamigyo-ku are made up of dark, wooden buildings, mainly o-chaya (teahouses) and okiya (geisha houses).

Unlike the other remaining districts, which are located close to the city center, Kamishichiken is further away, and accordingly significantly quieter and attracts fewer tourists. The geisha of this district are known for being subtle and demure, few in number but each highly accomplished dancers and musicians.
 There are approximately 25 maiko and geiko in Kamishichiken, along with 11 teahouses.
The district crest is a ring of skewered dango (sweet dumplings). On lanterns they appear as red circles on white paper (as opposed to Gion, which uses a similar design, but with the reverse colors – white dango on a red background).

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Copyright: Kudo Kenji Photograph
Typ: Spherical
Upplösning: 8800x4400
Taken: 13/03/2012
Uppladdad: 23/03/2012
Uppdaterad: 27/03/2015


Tags: kyo-machiya; ochaya; umeno; kyoto
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