Museum Of Art
dela
mail
License license
loading...
Loading ...

Panoramabild av W. H. Mahyo EXPERT Tagen 00:12, 23/08/2009 - Views loading...

Advertisement

Museum Of Art

The World > Europe > Romania > Bucharest

Tag: bucharest

  • Som / ogilla
  • thumbs up
  • thumbs down

The National Museum of Art of Romania (Romanian: Muzeul Naţional de Artă al României) is located in the former royal palace in Revolution Square, central Bucharest, Romania, completed in 1937. It features notable collections of medieval and modern Romanian art, as well as the international collection assembled by the Romanian royal family.
The museum was damaged during the 1989 Romanian Revolution that led to the downfall of Nicolae Ceauşescu. In 2000, part of the museum reopened to the public, housing the modern Romanian collection and the international collection; the comprehensive Medieval art collection, which now features works salvaged from monasteries destroyed during the Ceauşescu era, reopened only in spring 2002. There are also two halls that house temporary exhibits.
The modern Romanian collection features sculptures by Constantin Brâncuşi and Dimitrie Paciurea, as well as paintings by Theodor Aman, Nicolae Grigorescu, Theodor Pallady, Gheorghe Petraşcu, and Gheorghe Tattarescu.
The international collection includes works by Old Masters such as Domenico Veneziano, El Greco, Tintoretto, Jan van Eyck, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Peter Paul Rubens, and Rembrandt, plus a smattering of works by impressionists such as Claude Monet and Alfred Sisley. Among the most famous Old Master works in the collection are Jacopo Amigoni's portrait of the singer Farinelli, a Crucifixion by Antonello da Messina, and Alonso Cano's Christ at the Column.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Museum_of_Art_of_Romania

comments powered by Disqus

Närliggande bilder i Bucharest

map

A: The Romanian Senate in Bucharest

av Michael Pop, 90 meter bort

The Romanian Senate in Bucharest

B: Revolution Square

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 110 meter bort

Romanian: Piaţa Revoluţiei) is a square in central Bucharest, on Calea Victoriei. Known as Piaţa Pala...

Revolution Square

C: Revolution Square

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 120 meter bort

Romanian: Piaţa Revoluţiei) is a square in central Bucharest, on Calea Victoriei. Known as Piaţa Pala...

Revolution Square

D: Iuliu Maniu's statue in Revolutiei Square

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 140 meter bort

Iuliu Maniu's statue in Revolutiei Square

E: Romanian Athenaeum

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 150 meter bort

Romanian Athenaeum

F: Romanian Athenaeum

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 150 meter bort

Romanian Athenaeum

G: Romanian Athenee in Bucharest at sunset

av Michael Pop, 160 meter bort

Romanian Athenee in Bucharest at sunset

H: Cretulescu Church in Revolutiei Square

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 170 meter bort

Cretulescu Church in Revolutiei Square

I: Cretulescu Church in Revolutiei Square

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 170 meter bort

Cretulescu Church in Revolutiei Square

J: Sala Palatului and Cretulescu Church

av Andrei Zdetoveţchi, 210 meter bort

Sala Palatului and Cretulescu Church

Det här panoramat togs i Bucharest

Detta är en översikt av Bucharest

Overview and History

Bucharest, Romania was first mentioned in written history around 1459 AD. Since then it has gradually grown in influence, becoming the capital of Romania in 1862 and even earning the title "Paris of the East" for its cultural magnetism.

The city has a population of about two million people and makes up one of the main industrial centers of eastern europe.

The origin of the name Bucharest comes from the legendary outlaw and prince Bucur. Linguistic roots from Albanian and Thracian languages connect that name to words like "beautiful", "glad" and "joyous."

Bucharest was home to Wallachian Prince Vlad the Impaler in the 15th century. The city was burned down by the Ottomans in the early 17th century, rebuilt, and ravaged by the Plague over the next two hundred years. Battles between the Ottoman empire and the Austrian Hapsburgs saw Bucharest occupied by Austria and also Russia in the eighteenth century.

In 1861 Wallachia and Moldova were united to form the Principality of Romania with Bucharest as its capital. This new region was occupied by Germany during World War One and saw heavy Allied bombing in World War Two. In the middle of the war, Romania joined the Russian side against Germany, and was bombed again, ths time by the Luftwaffe.

Following the wars, Romania was under Communist leadership by Nicolae Ceausescu. His tenure came with the construction of many large Soviet-style buildings which took over the historic districts of the city. He was overthrown in the 1989 revolution.

The 1991 Constitution established Romania as a republic with a multi-party system, market economy and individual rights of free speech, religion and private ownership.

Romania joined NATO in 2004 and the European Union in 2007.

Getting There

You'll be flying into Henry Coanda International Bucharest Airport, the biggest airport in Romania. Henry Coanda built the world's first jet powered aircraft, did you know that?

The airport is 16km north of the city and connects by bus, taxi and a shuttle bus to the Gara de Nord, Bucharest's main train station.

Transportation

Bucharest has an extensive public transportation system, one of the largest in Europe. There's a Metro along with buses, minibuses, trams, trolleybuses and light rail. They have limited the number of taxi licenses to ten thousand to keep down the traffic problems.

The main train station is called the Gare de Nord and it connects to all the cities in Romania as well as Belgrade, Budapest, Vinena, Prague and Moscow. The commuter rail line is currently being extended to unite it with surrounding counties.

People and Culture

The currency is the Romanian Leu (RON) which exchanges at about 4.3 RON to the Euro at the time of this writing.

The first known art in Romania dates to 10,000 BC as cave paintings in northwest Transylvania. Pottery from the Neolithic Age (4000 BC) has been found widely, all around the country. Around 2000 BC there was a distinct group of Thracian people here, whom the Greeks referred to as "Getae". The Romans called them "Dacians" and Herotodus described them as ""the fairest and most courageous of men," because they believed in the immortality of the soul and were not afraid to die.

Things to do, Recommendations

Rumor has it that Romania sits on one of the world's strongest magnetic lines, and these are responsible for attracting psychics and... wait for it... VAMPIRES to the area!!!

Many "dracula" tours take place in Romania, including such places as Sighisoara, the Snagoc Monastery, Castle Bran and of course, Curtea Domneasca. These sites are all related to the life of Vlad Tepes, the legendary Count Dracula.

Apart from that, Bucharest is known for its large neoclassical buildings and fashionable parks (in their day). Visit Cismigiu Park, Calea Victoriei street and the Royal Palace for a taste of the architectural history.

Text by Steve Smith.

Dela detta panorama