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The memorial cottage of Latvian poets Rainis and Aspazija, Jurmala
Latvia

This is a study in  a summer cottage that was built in the end of the 19th century. Here Rainis and Aspazija lived from 1927 till the death of poet in 1929. In museum there is personal library, memorial rooms with original interior, as well as documental videos about the life of poets.


Rainis’ plays perfomed by Jūrmala pupils’ theatre are offered for the public in the memorial house.
Open: Wed. – Sun.: 11:00 – 18:00

Read more about Rainis at wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rainis

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Copyright: Vil muhametshin
Typ: Spherical
Resolution: 6000x3000
Uppladdad: 24/02/2010
Uppdaterad: 25/06/2014
Visningar:

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Tags: memorial cottage; latvian poets; rainis and aspazija; jurmala
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