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Yokoshiba-Hikarimachi - Kannon-in (rear) / 横芝光町 観音院 2
Japan

Day trip to Yokoshiba, August 2012. Yokoshiba Hikarimachi Kannon-in in Chiba Prefecture.

Let's face it, Yokoshiba Hikarimachi (Kido to be more precise) is out in the woop woop and is hardly a major tourist magnet, although it is pretty close to the beach! This old little temple is one of only a handful of remaining places I have known since early childhood that have thankfully managed to not change drastically. There is something comforting about coming back to a place where time has seemingly moved much more slowly and things have remained (mostly) as you remember them.

千葉県 山武郡 横芝光町 木戸 360度パノラマ

Copyright: Unkle Kennykoala
Typ: Spherical
Upplösning: 10000x5000
Uppladdad: 03/11/2012
Uppdaterad: 08/07/2014
Visningar:

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Tags: japan; chiba; temple; 2012
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The eight islands of Japan sprang into existence through Divine Intervention.The first two gods who came into existence were Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto, the Exalted Male and Exalted Female. It was their job to make the land for people to live on.They went to the bridge between heaven and earth and, using a jewel-encrusted halberd, Izanagi and Izanami churned up the sea into a frothy foam. As salty drips of water fell from the tip of the halberd the first island was formed. Its name was Onogoro.So far, so good. But when Izanagi and Izanami first met on their island, Izanami spoke to Isanagi without being spoken to first. Since she was the female, and this was improper, their first union created badly-formed offspring who were sent off into the sea in boats.The next time they met, Izanagi was sure to speak first, ensuring the proper rules were followed, and this time they produced eight children, which became the islands of Japan.I'm sure you did not fail to miss the significance of this myth for the establishment of Japanese formal society.At present, Japan is the financial capital of Asia. It has the second largest economy in the world and the largest metropolitan area (Tokyo.)Technically there are three thousand islands making up the Japanese archipelago. Izanagi and Izanami must have been busy little devils with their jewelled halberd...Japan's culture is highly technical and organized. Everything sparkles and swooshes on silent, miniaturized mechanisms.They're a world leader in robotics, and the Japanese have the longest life-expectancy on earth.Text by Steve Smith.