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Main Quad, Pembina Hall
Canada

This panorama was taken outside of Pembina Hall. This building was built in 1914 and is one of the University of Alberta's oldest historical buildings. Today, it is the home of the School of Native Studies.

Pembina was originally an all-purpose building and student residence. It was the first building on campus to be made with a steel and concrete frame. UAlberta had hoped to use local stone for the structure, and Ualberta professor of architecture Cecil Scott Burgess travelled about 100km west to see if stone from Pembina River might be suitable. The stone was not suited to construction but the casual label "Pembina stone" on the plans stuck with the building, nonetheless.

Copyright: University Of Alberta
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 30000x15000
上传: 09/10/2012
更新: 22/04/2014
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Tags: university of alberta; north campus; pembina; native studies; edmonton; outdoors; alberta
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