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Shirin Gallery The Sixth Annual Montakhabe Nasle No 2012 03
Tehran

“Montakhab Nasle No” or better say the selected among the new generation  was born in the days that Iranian art, was still  dominated by modern art and the lack of the presence of the new generation was very evident. There was no choice except that young artists were given equal opportunity and despite the plurality and the possibility to rehabilitate, but inevitably it was considered the only non-discriminatory manner.

In all previous “Montakhab Nasle No” periods until this forthcoming one which will be the sixth year, it has been tried not to claim a certain judgement and this approach has been selected as the main foundation of the “Montakhab Nasle No” resolution. 

The only way to be constraint to this approach is by changing the arbitrators and administrative personnel. But despite all, “Montakhab Nasle No” is still influenced by the outcome of the atmosphere of visual arts every year, and it is not considered deficiency by rather consider it as a realistic characteristic and representation of  the annual “Montakhab Nasle No.”

In general each period is based on a principle that a certain gap between demand and transient likes or dislikes should be created to preserve the cultural arts, obviously there is no claim on its inerrancy.

On the other hand the procedure for rejecting and confirming the art works is the result of the knowledge and perspective of the arbitration board and we hope that like previous years “Montakhab Nasle No” maintains its independency and to avoid oppression and that the years ahead will also find the same continuity.

I would also like to use this opportunity to thank my colleagues and not only friends, Shirin Partovi, Ehsan Rasoolof, Hassan Hamedi, & Ehsan Lajevardi, whom with their empathy and sympathy, unsparingly were helping and working along our side. And at the end it is just a reminder of the name we have known for the past six years, “Montakhab Nasle NO”, which was a wish of one person, Parviz Maleki, whose dream was to promote art and culture of his country, so we also commit ourselves and remember his name and hope that the small seed he once planted will one day become a robust and sturdy tree.

Hengameh Moameri

Director of “Montakhab Nasle No”

Winter 2012

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