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Chelmno - behind the altar of the Dominican Church
Poland

The Peter and Paul Church, former Church of the Dominican Order, in Chelmno/Kulm in the North of Poland. Behind the altar. On the backside, German inscriptions, initials and seals of artists and hand crafters can be read. Erected in the early 14th century, the edifice contains late Roman and early Gothic elements, while the interior origins from the Baroque era. Most of the Baroque decoration had been removed after the church was given over to the Evangelic Church in the 18th century. During the Communist dictatorship, the church was more or less left to fall apart. This was, among others, due to the numerous traces of the former German culture inside of the church, including inscriptions in the German language. In the present day, the church is being renewed, which may mean 'rebuilding from the scratch' in many cases, by a bunch of private persons.

Copyright: Alexander Jensko
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 6324x3162
Uploaded: 03/08/2011
Updated: 06/08/2014
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Tags: altar; dominican; church; chelmno; kulm; poland
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