1 Like

Near The Broken Chair
Geneva, Switzerland

The Broken Chair is a monumental sculpture in wood by the Swiss artist Daniel Berset, constructed by the carpenter Louis Genève. It is constructed of 5.5 tons of wood and is 12 metres (39 feet) high.


It depicts a giant chair with a broken leg and stands across the street from the Palace of Nations, in Geneva. It symbolises opposition to land mines and cluster bombs, and acts as a reminder to politicians and others visiting

The Broken Chair is a project of Paul Vermeulen, co-founder and director of Handicap International Suisse. The sculpture was erected by Handicap International in front of the main entrance to the Palais des Nations in Geneva in August 1997, where it was intended to remain for three months, until the signature of the Ottawa Treaty in December 1997 in Ottawa. Following ratification by 40 countries, the Treaty became effective as an instrument of international law on 1st march 1999.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_Chair

View More »

Copyright: J P. Scherrer
Type: Spherical
Resolution: 7852x3926
Uploaded: 01/07/2010
Updated: 17/09/2014
Views:

...


Tags: geneva; switzerland; united nations; un; broken chair; handicap international; place des nations
comments powered by Disqus

J-P. Scherrer
Under The Broken Chair
J-P. Scherrer
Place Des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland
Eric Souvaroff
Musée Ariana, Geneva
Eric Souvaroff
Ariana Muséum, Geneva, Switzerland
yunzen liu
United Nations headquarters New York United States
Laurent Egli
UN Human Rights Counsil 16th Session
J-P. Scherrer
Park de la Perle du Lac #2 (Pearl of the Lake Park)
J-P. Scherrer
Parc of "La Perle Du Lac" on Geneva's lake side
J-P. Scherrer
The Palais Wilson
J-P. Scherrer
Cornavin Train Station
Eric Souvaroff
Hotel President Wilson, Geneva
Rizzotti André
Bellagio Hall
ehcsimred
Fliegender Teppich
Jakub Hruska
Tusimice open cast mine
Jürgen Matern
On the old Navajo Bridge over Marble Canyon
Jürgen Matern
Innerhalb des Double Arch im Arches Nationalpark
Maciej G. Szling
Morskie Oko
Marek Szarejko
Halloween Historic Stages Rally
Jakub Hruska
On SchRs 1550 Excavator in Tusimice mine
Iraklis Kavouklis
The Monastrery of Agios Pandeleimon - Tilos - Greece
heiwa4126
John Lennon Museum
Konrad Łaszczyński
Moroccan pottery maker in Safi
Scott Anderson
Old Man of Storr 2, Isle of Skye, Scotland
Sam Simbulan
Juneau coast
J-P. Scherrer
Place Du Marche in Carouge, Geneva, Switzerland
J-P. Scherrer
Quai General Guisan, Geneva, Switzerland
J-P. Scherrer
Cour De L'Hotel De Ville, Geneva, Switzerland
J-P. Scherrer
Museum of Art and History Lobby
J-P. Scherrer
In the vineyards over Lake Geneva, near Montreux #2
J-P. Scherrer
PC room...
J-P. Scherrer
Jardin Anglais #1
J-P. Scherrer
Geneva Fountain from the jetty of Paquis
J-P. Scherrer
Place De La Madeleine, Geneva, Switzerland
J-P. Scherrer
Cour St.-Pierre, Geneva, Switzerland
J-P. Scherrer
The Palais Wilson
J-P. Scherrer
Eaux-Vives Dike #1
More About Europe

Europe is generally agreed to be the birthplace of western culture, including such legendary innovations as the democratic nation-state, football and tomato sauce.The word Europe comes from the Greek goddess Europa, who was kidnapped by Zeus and plunked down on the island of Crete. Europa gradually changed from referring to mainland Greece until it extended finally to include Norway and Russia.Don't be confused that Europe is called a continent without looking like an island, the way the other continents do. It's okay. The Ural mountains have steadily been there to divide Europe from Asia for the last 250 million years. Russia technically inhabits "Eurasia".Europe is presently uniting into one political and economic zone with a common currency called the Euro. The European Union originated in 1993 and is now composed of 27 member states. Its headquarters is in Brussels, Belgium.Do not confuse the EU with the Council of Europe, which has 47 member states and dates to 1949. These two bodies share the same flag, national anthem, and mission of integrating Europe. The headquarters of the Council are located in Strasbourg, France, and it is most famous for its European Court of Human Rights. In spite of these two bodies, there is still no single Constitution or set of laws applying to all the countries of Europe. Debate rages over the role of the EU in regards to national sovereignty. As of January 2009, the Lisbon Treaty is the closest thing to a European Constitution, yet it has not been approved by all the EU states. Text by Steve Smith.